Monthly Archives: May 2018

WiFi experiment kills plants

An interesting experiment. If this affects plants what can it do to the human body. A women in Ireland removed her 3 kids from school who were suffering headaches, nausea and lack of concentration that she surmised was from the Wifi. At home she has no WiFi and the kids were fine. Will this become the next asbestos or smoking creating a whole new chapter of illness down the road? You may want to do some research so you can make up your own mind for you, your kids and grandkids. We don’t have WiFi and never put a cell phone next to our ear as a precaution… actually we’ve measured the electromagnetic energy coming from a cell phone and the “danger” levels extend 4-5 feet out! -AALady

Wi-Fi Could Be Killing Plants

An experiment conducted by ninth grade children from Sweden in 2013 presented a scary picture of the effects of Wi-Fi on plants. The children planted 400 cress seeds in 12 trays. They placed six trays in two rooms at the same temperature, giving them the same amount of water and sunlight for the next 12 days. The only difference is that one set was placed in a room with Wi-Fi routers.

Stunningly, the one which was exposed to Wi-Fi didn’t grow and some of the plants were even stunted.

The cress plants in the other set showed healthy growth. While the results couldn’t be proved by a meta-study in 2013, the initial school project did pique the curiosity of researchers from Holland, England and Sweden.

*Check out ways you can mitigate EMF effects from your phone:     Click Here

 

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Dr.’s who recommend folic acid may be wrong

Homocysteine is a naturally-occurring amino acid that is a breakdown product of the essential amino acid, methionine and is linked to cardio problems, cancer and DVT. Normally the homocysteine is converted back into a harmless amino, cysteine but folks with gluten sensitivity may increase its buildup. Low levels of  Vitamin B, especially B12 and B6 also puts them at risk. Women with the highest homocysteine levels had 2.3 times the heart attack risk and also had low folic acid levels, which has also been linked to autism.

Doctors seem to recommend supplementing with folic acid to help homocysteine normalize and especially when recommending the Bs. But, if they don’t test you for a mutant MRHFR gene they can’t tell you which folic is good for you and which can be dangerous.  “Folic acid” and “Folate” are often used interchangeably to describe Vitamin B9. But, they are not the same. Folic acid, is actually a synthetic form of Vitamin B9, which is not found in nature, nor is it naturally found in the human body. In order for folic acid to be metabolized, it must undergo metabolism via the enzymes FOLR2 and DHFR, primarily in the liver although many people don’t have enough of these enzymes to do the job, such as those with an MTHFR mutation. These individuals cannot complete the final metabolic step that converts folic acid to the active form L-methylfolate (5-MTHF)

An epidemiological study conducted in 2007 found that men and women with previous colorectal adenomas, who took 1000 mcg of folic acid daily for 6-8 years had increased risk factors for colorectal cancer (10). It is certainly plausible to consider the possible cancer risks associated with excessive folic acid. It is for this reason that certain conventional cancer treatments use folate-blocking drugs such as methotrexate.

However, natural folates found in whole foods appear to be metabolized via the intestinal mucosa. A more homogeneous choice would be L-methylfolate which is the biologically active form of vitamin B9.  L-Methylfolate (5-MTHF) has emerged as a popular alternative, and has been used as a complementary medicine in several recent clinical trials. Studies show that L-Methyfolate supplementation is equally (if not more) effective than folic acid for increasing circulating folate in those with an MTHFR mutation. It is also highly effective at reducing homocysteine levels in healthy people. It is also better absorbed and interacts with fewer medications than folic acid.

Note: To find out whether MTHFR should be on your radar, you can take raw data from 23andme, or another provider like Ancestry, and upload the data to a site like Genetic Genie to determine whether you have one copy, or two copies of either MTHFR C677T, or MTHFR A1298C, the “mutant” versions of the gene.

Don’t forget to check out our sponsor: Daily Metrix liquid vitamins (alternative to 40 pills/day) www.longlifenews.com

 

 

 

Nattokinase: help to prevent strokes

Nattokinase is a protein digesting enzyme isolated from the traditional Japanese food prepared from fermented soybeans. Fermentation converts to a form that is safe and can be absorbed, the enzyme inhibitor in soy that prevents digestion and creates the estrogenic problems.

Nattokinase works by breaking down fibrogen, a component of blood clots and plaque. It is different from an anticoagulant like Coumadin. A blood clot forms after the platelets, fibrogen and red blood cells aggregate in the presence of clotting factors. Nattokinase can help break down a clot by breaking down the fibrin mesh that holds the clot together. It does this by increasing the activity of the body’s natural clot buster (plasmin).

Aspirin and fish oil helps prevent clots by reducing the stickiness that lets the form to coagulate. Nattokinase actually can help reduce the bad cholesterol (LDL) and increase the good (HDL) as well as reducing blood viscosity and improving blood flow and lowering blood pressure.

Do your own research to see if this is right for your or ask your ND. Don’t use it if you are already on a prescription blood thinner.

Don’t forget to check out the liquid vitamins with humic/fulvic we take ourselves. www.longlifenews.com