Category Archives: Pets

House plants that clean the air

These are the plants I use in my house, although I built my home as a non-toxic one so they are useful for whatever else shows up.

Spider plants are among the easiest houseplants to grow,  and remove formaldehyde, benzene, carbon monoxide an xylene, a solvent. Spider plants are OK to have around your pets.

Peace lily plants are relatively small compared to many of the plants on this list, but they still pack some major air-cleaning abilities. Easy to grow, and remove ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde, and trichloroethylene. They are toxic to pets so please don’t keep them in a spot where the animals can chew on them.

Boston Ferns prefer to clean the air from a cool location with  high humidity so make sure in the winter you add a humidifier to your room.  They’re relatively easy to grow, but they do need to stay moist. They also remove formaldehyde and xylene and are fine to have around pets.

In addition to being easy to care for, Aloe ‘s leaves contain a clear liquid full of vitamins, enzymes, amino acids, and other compounds that have wound-healing, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties, but don’t eat the plant… it must be processed correctly or is toxic to the body. It also removes formaldehyde. Do not leave where you pet can chomp on it as they may develop diarrhea and if it gets severe you may have to take them to the vet.

*Boston fern photo by yardtech.com.au

 Note: read on my blog why I stopped taking vitamin pills .  Click Here

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Keep your pet safe during the holidays.

img_0472We offered this in 2014 but in case you forgot, figured it was important to mention again.

Tips to keep your pet safe during the holidays. Those great holiday plants are a pretty accessory but don’t let them eat mistletoe or holly…poinsettias aren’t lethal but can cause vomiting and diarrhea. Don’t let them drink the water under the tree especially if you’ve added longevity chemicals to keep the tree green, and don’t let them eat pine needles.

Make sure you keep tinsel and ornaments away and make sure they can’t chew light wires. Also they my chomp down ribbons and paper so watch them. Snow globes are filled with antifreeze which could kill them so if one breaks clean it up and keep the pet out of the room while cleaning.

 Make sure you don’t leave chocolate, gravy, spicy foods, cooked bones, alcohol where your pet can ingest it. Candles should be extinguished while you are not in the room as the pet may knock it over and burn your house down. Also potpourri can make them sick as can those oil fragrance sticks (the oil can be lethal).

And last but not least, keep your pets away from party guests if they seem to be getting stressed due to all the commotion. Best to keep them in a safe space until the party is over.

-don’ t forget to get the free download of my new book Think and Feel Younger  http://y0ungerebook.gr8.com

 

 

 

 

Cats and poisonous plants

tigdaisyWe know that lots of our readers have pets and many are kitties. We ourselves have many furry family members. We thought we’d share this information for cat owners who want to make sure their pets don’t get sick or die from eating houseplants or toxic yard plants. This is the list:

Lilies: both outdoor (tiger, daylilies,etc) and houseplants (Easter lilies, Peace lilies) when ingested can cause kidney failure  and death if not gotten to the vet immediately. Even a small bite can be toxic. If they start vomiting, get depressed and lose their appetite… look around. They may also drool and paw at the irritated areas. You may also get foaming and swelling. If you see part of the plant munched – get them to the vet.

Aloa vera: Many of us have these cactus in our homes and most cats will leave them alone, but if they should chomp on them they can get irritation of the mouth, tongue and esophagus. While not as critical as lily ingestion a visit to the vet will be prudent.

Other toxic plants are asparagus fern, amaryllis, daffodil and lily of the valley. Also watch out for dieffenbachia, rhododendron, azalea, oleander – all outdoor plants which normally cats avoid.

If you suspect the cat is acting differently, avoiding food or acting lethargic get them to the vet. If you can determine if they munched on a plant bring part of it with you. We all want our furry kids to be around a long time so you need to be diligent and not have those types of plants indoors. It’s more difficult outdoors but most cats know which ones not to munch on. Also please don’t spray your lawn with pesticides as cats and dogs not only eat the grass, but walk on it and then lick their feet. Pesticide poisoning may not show up immediately but can lead to neural damage and cancer.

 

Why grain-free for your pooch or kitty?

ChristophercloseIn recent years the trend has been to give our pets grain free food saying they do not eat that in the wild. So I wanted to know exactly why and found an article in Whole Foods magazine (march 2016) that made sense. The article “Putting Your Best Paw Forward” by Maxine Bogle told me that pets who eat large quantities of grains long-term can get metabolic upsets, chronic illness and bouts of inflammation.

It seems that once they eat grains, the “pancreas begins to secrete larger amounts of the enzyme necessary to process carbs (amylase) and insulin, the hormone necessary to balance the elevated blood sugar resulting from the metabolism of grains.”  Since pets don’t readily secrete enough amylase this causes insulin to be released and the blood sugar levels drop. The result is the adrenals release cortisol which can elevate blood sugar and lead to diabetes. It can also cause high blood pressure that can result in thinning of the skin and coat, decreased bone and muscle mass and cause them to be more susceptible to infection.

This doesn’t say that cold turkey on grains is the answer to all their problems, and some can tolerate grains better than others. Therefore, its best to consult a vet who is up-to-date on this subject and get their advice for your furry family member.

PS. Don’t forget to get the FREE download of my new e-book “Think and Feel Younger” : Click Here

New info for your furry family member.

I started a new blog for wellness tips for dogs and cats. This is not a “cure” site but gives you tips on how to keep your pet healthy and offers some suggestions on supplements you may want to investigate.

PS. Don’t forget to get a FREE e-copy of my new book “Think and Feel Younger” Click Here

 

Nick will stare at you til you do..

nickcabinetcrop

 

Don’t kill your pet while killing fleas and ticks!

nickcabinetcropI hate fleas and ticks but I’m not willing to kill my cat or dog just to be rid of those pests and that is exactly what 90% of the collars, topical and sprays can do. Most contain neurotoxins which ofter time can destroy the efficiency of your pooch or kitties brain and they can harm your children too. Insect pesticide neurotoxins are the primary active ingredients in most canine flea & tick medication. Insect neurotoxins will stop existing infestations of fleas and ticks by attacking the central nervous systems of bugs. And guess what they do to your pet long term?

The most common insect neurotoxins in dog flea and tick medications are: Fipronil (FIH-pron-ill), found most commonly in Frontline for cats and PetArmor products.Imidacloprid (eye-mid-uh-CLOP-rid), found most commonly in the K9 Advantix and Advantage II products. Permethrin (per-METH-rin), also found most commonly in Advantix products, as well as Protical products.

Flea collars are designed to leave pesticide residues on pet fur, exposing people to the chemicals they contain when they play with their pet or touch pet bedding. If you child plays with the pet the pesticide is absorbed through their skin or it can be ingested when a child puts their hand in their mouth. Propoxur and TCVP are types of pesticides found in flea collars that are known to be toxic to brain development, nervous system communication and can cause cancer.  In large doses, these chemicals can also harm or kill dogs, cats and in extreme poisoning cases, even humans.

Most topical flea treatments are neurotoxins and can affect the brain. Pets may exhibit the following symptoms.

  • Rash
  • Redness
  • Loss of hair
  • Itching with discoloration
  • Drooling
  • Increased excitability
  • Changes in body temperature (lower or higher)
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of coordination
  • Seizures
  • Lethargy

So what is the alternative? Diatomaceous earth, garlic, brewer’s yeast, and essential oil products are the most common natural remedies. The problem with the oils is that they contain phenols which are toxic to animals because their liver can’t detoxify it, so its best not to use the essential oils. And many contain peppermint which may be OK for dogs but not for cats. I found a company that makes Eastern Red Cedar oil that is properly diluted with a hydrated silica carrier oil at a 90% ratio.  It is not known to be harmful to cats or kittens, since it does not contain phenols, or phenolic compounds, which occur naturally in many essential oils. This is extremely effective and you only have to apply it once a week. See their website: http://bit.ly/1K5otd6