Tag Archives: cats

Is your pet getting sick because of your wifi?

I don’t mean to harp on this subject but it needs to be said. A big article came out recently in the Innovative Veterinary Care magazine from Canada regarding the effects electro-pollution had on our pets (us too). I am taking out bits from that article.

Ionizing EMR (electromagnetic radiation) are known to cause direct damage to cells and DNA such as those from x-rays. Non-ionizing EMR is low-frequency found coming from our electronics and are thought to be safe if they don’t create heat, but studies have shown that is a fallacy. Evidence from studies and research has shown that EMR even if it doesn’t heat tissue, compromises normal physiology and intercellular communication leading to the breakdown of healthy cellular processes. If the cell deteriorates its membranes harden, free radical damage occurs, nutrients can’t find their way in and toxins can’t be removed.

Other problems occur as endocrine function is harmed and vets have seen a marked increase in endocrine disease in pets over the last 20 years. EMR radiation is a hormone disruptor and causes reduced melatonin levels which is a key hormone in keeping free radicals in check. Tests showed increases in human breast cancer cell growth when exposed to EMR. We have also seen an increase in pet cancers lately even when they are kept indoors (perhaps in a WiFi environment). As melatonin is key in suppressing the development of breast cancer, it also supports the killer lymphocytes and enhances the ability of vitamin D to inhibit tumor growth.

Many studies are also reporting the effects of EMR on wildlife with one showing when mobile phones were placed in a honey bee hive, worker bees stopped returning and honey production steadily declined. It is not only our indoor pets that we need to be concerned about. Riders on horseback who keep their phones turned on and in their back pockets are exposing the animals to high electromagnetic radiation.  And remember that your dog, cat, gerbil, pet bird, and fish are tiny compared to a human. Therefore a small amount of exposure would be much more lethal as it has shown to be to a small child.

Best solution is to keep phones away from pets, to limit use of WiFi and investigate one of the subtle energy technologies, diodes and pendants you can affix to their collar or cage to harmonize the frequencies and make them less destructive to the body.

Excerpted from:  IVC Summer Issue 2018 Evaluating the Effects of Electro-Pollution on Human and Animal Health by Katie B. Kangas, DVM, CVA, CVCP

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Why dry food is not helpful for cats (and dogs)?

Cats can develop kidney problems from eating a dry food only diet. Since they originated in the desert they are genetically trained to get moisture from their food and only when really thirsty will drink from a water bowl. This is usually the point at which they are already extremely dehydrated.

So if you feed kibble which needs moisture to break it down to digestible form, where do you think it will obtain that? It comes from the cat’s body, which will further dehydrate it. This also stresses the kidneys and over time can translate into urinary tract disease, stones, infections or kidney disease.

If you must feed dry, please make it wet before you offer it to kitty but placing in a bowl of water so it can absorb the needed moisture. While this is not real convenient if you are accustomed to leaving a bowl of food out all day, it will save you vet bills in the long run. Plus a lot of dry food contains grain which is not a normal staple for wild cats. Wet grain-free food is the healthiest for your whiskered family member.

Dogs are better adapted to dry food because they readily drink from a water bowl. But it is still best to feed the wet food or a mixture. Maybe you noticed your dog wolfing food down. This is normal and their stomachs are made for this because in the wild they need to eat and run. But, this wolfing is better adapted to wet food as when fed dry they are five times more likely to bloat.

read my book, Super Nutrition for Dogs n Cats  from Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Super-Nutrition-Dogs-Cats-Nina-Anderson/dp/188482059X

Cats and poisonous plants

tigdaisyWe know that lots of our readers have pets and many are kitties. We ourselves have many furry family members. We thought we’d share this information for cat owners who want to make sure their pets don’t get sick or die from eating houseplants or toxic yard plants. This is the list:

Lilies: both outdoor (tiger, daylilies,etc) and houseplants (Easter lilies, Peace lilies) when ingested can cause kidney failure  and death if not gotten to the vet immediately. Even a small bite can be toxic. If they start vomiting, get depressed and lose their appetite… look around. They may also drool and paw at the irritated areas. You may also get foaming and swelling. If you see part of the plant munched – get them to the vet.

Aloa vera: Many of us have these cactus in our homes and most cats will leave them alone, but if they should chomp on them they can get irritation of the mouth, tongue and esophagus. While not as critical as lily ingestion a visit to the vet will be prudent.

Other toxic plants are asparagus fern, amaryllis, daffodil and lily of the valley. Also watch out for dieffenbachia, rhododendron, azalea, oleander – all outdoor plants which normally cats avoid.

If you suspect the cat is acting differently, avoiding food or acting lethargic get them to the vet. If you can determine if they munched on a plant bring part of it with you. We all want our furry kids to be around a long time so you need to be diligent and not have those types of plants indoors. It’s more difficult outdoors but most cats know which ones not to munch on. Also please don’t spray your lawn with pesticides as cats and dogs not only eat the grass, but walk on it and then lick their feet. Pesticide poisoning may not show up immediately but can lead to neural damage and cancer.

 

Why grain-free for your pooch or kitty?

ChristophercloseIn recent years the trend has been to give our pets grain free food saying they do not eat that in the wild. So I wanted to know exactly why and found an article in Whole Foods magazine (march 2016) that made sense. The article “Putting Your Best Paw Forward” by Maxine Bogle told me that pets who eat large quantities of grains long-term can get metabolic upsets, chronic illness and bouts of inflammation.

It seems that once they eat grains, the “pancreas begins to secrete larger amounts of the enzyme necessary to process carbs (amylase) and insulin, the hormone necessary to balance the elevated blood sugar resulting from the metabolism of grains.”  Since pets don’t readily secrete enough amylase this causes insulin to be released and the blood sugar levels drop. The result is the adrenals release cortisol which can elevate blood sugar and lead to diabetes. It can also cause high blood pressure that can result in thinning of the skin and coat, decreased bone and muscle mass and cause them to be more susceptible to infection.

This doesn’t say that cold turkey on grains is the answer to all their problems, and some can tolerate grains better than others. Therefore, its best to consult a vet who is up-to-date on this subject and get their advice for your furry family member.

PS. Don’t forget to get the FREE download of my new e-book “Think and Feel Younger” : Click Here

New info for your furry family member.

I started a new blog for wellness tips for dogs and cats. This is not a “cure” site but gives you tips on how to keep your pet healthy and offers some suggestions on supplements you may want to investigate.

PS. Don’t forget to get a FREE e-copy of my new book “Think and Feel Younger” Click Here

 

Nick will stare at you til you do..

nickcabinetcrop

 

Don’t kill your pet while killing fleas and ticks!

nickcabinetcropI hate fleas and ticks but I’m not willing to kill my cat or dog just to be rid of those pests and that is exactly what 90% of the collars, topical and sprays can do. Most contain neurotoxins which ofter time can destroy the efficiency of your pooch or kitties brain and they can harm your children too. Insect pesticide neurotoxins are the primary active ingredients in most canine flea & tick medication. Insect neurotoxins will stop existing infestations of fleas and ticks by attacking the central nervous systems of bugs. And guess what they do to your pet long term?

The most common insect neurotoxins in dog flea and tick medications are: Fipronil (FIH-pron-ill), found most commonly in Frontline for cats and PetArmor products.Imidacloprid (eye-mid-uh-CLOP-rid), found most commonly in the K9 Advantix and Advantage II products. Permethrin (per-METH-rin), also found most commonly in Advantix products, as well as Protical products.

Flea collars are designed to leave pesticide residues on pet fur, exposing people to the chemicals they contain when they play with their pet or touch pet bedding. If you child plays with the pet the pesticide is absorbed through their skin or it can be ingested when a child puts their hand in their mouth. Propoxur and TCVP are types of pesticides found in flea collars that are known to be toxic to brain development, nervous system communication and can cause cancer.  In large doses, these chemicals can also harm or kill dogs, cats and in extreme poisoning cases, even humans.

Most topical flea treatments are neurotoxins and can affect the brain. Pets may exhibit the following symptoms.

  • Rash
  • Redness
  • Loss of hair
  • Itching with discoloration
  • Drooling
  • Increased excitability
  • Changes in body temperature (lower or higher)
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of coordination
  • Seizures
  • Lethargy

So what is the alternative? Diatomaceous earth, garlic, brewer’s yeast, and essential oil products are the most common natural remedies. The problem with the oils is that they contain phenols which are toxic to animals because their liver can’t detoxify it, so its best not to use the essential oils. And many contain peppermint which may be OK for dogs but not for cats. I found a company that makes Eastern Red Cedar oil that is properly diluted with a hydrated silica carrier oil at a 90% ratio.  It is not known to be harmful to cats or kittens, since it does not contain phenols, or phenolic compounds, which occur naturally in many essential oils. This is extremely effective and you only have to apply it once a week. See their website: http://bit.ly/1K5otd6

Don’t let your pet eat the misteltoe

catsatdinnerHave a happy holiday season from the anti-aging lady and her pets.

Tips to keep your pet safe especially during the Holidays:

1. Don’t let them eat mistletoe or holly…poinsettias aren’t lethal but can cause vomiting and diarrhea.

2. Don’t let them drink the water under the tree especially if you’ve added longevity chemicals.

3. Keep tinsel and ornament away and make sure they can’t chew light wires. Also they my chomp down ribbons and paper so watch them.

4. Don’t let them eat pine needles.

5. Keep away: chocolate, gravy, spicy foods, cooked bones, alcohol.

6. Snow globes are filled with antifreeze which could kill them so if one breaks clean it up and keep the pet out of the room while cleaning.

7. Candles should be extinguished while you are not in the room as the pet may knock it over and burn your house down. Also potpourri can make them sick as can those oil fragrance sticks (the oil can be lethal).

8. Keep your pets away from party guests if them seem to be getting stressed due to all the commotion.

*reprinted from Trupanion.com