Monthly Archives: April 2015

Can GMO food make us antibiotic resistant?

gmoGenetic engineering (GE) is the modification of an organism’s genetic composition by artificial means, often involving the transfer of specific traits, or genes, from one organism into a plant or animal of an entirely different species. When gene transfer occurs, the resulting organism is called transgenic or a GMO (genetically modified organism). Critics of genetic engineering believe that GE foods must be proven safe before they are sold to the public. Specific concerns over genetic engineering include:

Antibiotic resistance. Almost all GE foods contain antibiotic resistance marker genes that help producers know whether the new genetic material was transferred to the host plant or animal. GE food could make disease-causing bacteria even more resistant to antibiotics, which could increase the spread of disease throughout the world.

Allergic reactions. There are two concerns regarding allergic reactions. The first is with known allergens. For example, if genes from nuts are inserted into other foods, it could cause severe reactions in people with nut allergies. Therefore, there is concern that people with known allergies will not be aware that the genetically engineered food they are eating contains substances to which they are allergic. The second concern is that new allergies might be created, since new combinations of genes and traits have the potential to cause allergic reactions that have never existed before.

Loss of nutrition. Genetic engineering may change the nutritional value of food.

Foods that have been approved for GMO by the FDA but not necessarily in the grocery store yet are starred (*):  Alfalfa, Cherry Tomato*, Corn, Flax*, Papaya, Potato*, Rice*, Soybean, Squash, Sugar beet, Tomato*

More info: http://www.sustainabletable.org/264/genetic-engineering

Pain cream on your hands can kill your cat!

Veterinarians have long warned that pain medications like ibuprofen are toxic to pets. And it now looks like merely using a pain relief cream can put cats at risk.

That’s what happened in two households, according to a report issued Friday by the Food and Drug Administration. Two cats in one household developed kidney failure and recovered with attention from a veterinarian. But in a second household, three cats died.

When the veterinarians performed necropsies on the three dead cats, they found physical damage in the cats’ intestines and kidneys, evidence of the toxic effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. NSAIDs include ibuprofen, like Advil and Motrin, and naproxen, which is in Aleve.

Ibuprofen is the most common drug that pets eat, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association, perhaps since many of the pills are candy-coated. In pets, the drugs can cause stomach or intestinal ulcers and kidney failure.

But these cats died by flurbiprofen, another NSAID. In the case of its most recent victims, the cat owner applied a lotion or cream containing flurbiprofen to treat muscle or arthritis pain. And it’s highly unusual for a cat to show up at the vet’s office; usually it’s the dogs that get into trouble from exposure to NSAIDs.

Don’t kill your pet while killing fleas and ticks!

nickcabinetcropI hate fleas and ticks but I’m not willing to kill my cat or dog just to be rid of those pests and that is exactly what 90% of the collars, topical and sprays can do. Most contain neurotoxins which ofter time can destroy the efficiency of your pooch or kitties brain and they can harm your children too. Insect pesticide neurotoxins are the primary active ingredients in most canine flea & tick medication. Insect neurotoxins will stop existing infestations of fleas and ticks by attacking the central nervous systems of bugs. And guess what they do to your pet long term?

The most common insect neurotoxins in dog flea and tick medications are: Fipronil (FIH-pron-ill), found most commonly in Frontline for cats and PetArmor products.Imidacloprid (eye-mid-uh-CLOP-rid), found most commonly in the K9 Advantix and Advantage II products. Permethrin (per-METH-rin), also found most commonly in Advantix products, as well as Protical products.

Flea collars are designed to leave pesticide residues on pet fur, exposing people to the chemicals they contain when they play with their pet or touch pet bedding. If you child plays with the pet the pesticide is absorbed through their skin or it can be ingested when a child puts their hand in their mouth. Propoxur and TCVP are types of pesticides found in flea collars that are known to be toxic to brain development, nervous system communication and can cause cancer.  In large doses, these chemicals can also harm or kill dogs, cats and in extreme poisoning cases, even humans.

Most topical flea treatments are neurotoxins and can affect the brain. Pets may exhibit the following symptoms.

  • Rash
  • Redness
  • Loss of hair
  • Itching with discoloration
  • Drooling
  • Increased excitability
  • Changes in body temperature (lower or higher)
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lack of coordination
  • Seizures
  • Lethargy

So what is the alternative? Diatomaceous earth, garlic, brewer’s yeast, and essential oil products are the most common natural remedies. The problem with the oils is that they contain phenols which are toxic to animals because their liver can’t detoxify it, so its best not to use the essential oils. And many contain peppermint which may be OK for dogs but not for cats. I found a company that makes Eastern Red Cedar oil that is properly diluted with a hydrated silica carrier oil at a 90% ratio.  It is not known to be harmful to cats or kittens, since it does not contain phenols, or phenolic compounds, which occur naturally in many essential oils. This is extremely effective and you only have to apply it once a week. See their website: http://bit.ly/1K5otd6

Vitamin D Increases Cancer Survival Length

100px-Pink_ribbon_svgA new study reported a the 2015 American Society of Cancer Oncology Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium shows that metastatic colorectal cancer patients who had high levels of vitamin D in their bloodstream prior to chemo survived longer on an average than those who did not.  On the average the groups with the highest levels of vitamin D survived 33% longer and also were associated with longer time to disease progression. Previous studies already showed that vitamin D may play a role in cancer inhibition.

-Whole Foods magazine March 2015 “News Links”