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Foods to stay young

Sucralose – a bad dude!

reprinted from Research Reveals Disturbing Sucralose (Splenda) Side Effects (mercola.com)

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • The artificial sweetener industry has defended the safety of sucralose (Splenda), stating that it rapidly passes through your body without being broken down and therefore has no biological effects
  • Research reveals your body does indeed metabolize sucralose and that it accumulates in your fat cells. Two new metabolites were also identified. As these findings were not part of the original regulatory decision process for sucralose, researchers are calling for a review of its safety and regulatory status
  • Sucralose causes definite changes in the liver of treated rats, suggesting toxic effects. According to the researchers, sucralose should be used with caution to avoid liver damage
  • Previous research found sucralose reduces gut bacteria by 50%, increases the intestinal pH level and causes biochemical distortions. This was again confirmed in 2018, when all currently approved artificial sweeteners were found to cause DNA damage in, and interfere with, the normal and healthy activity of gut bacteria
  • Consuming artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, aspartame, saccharin, neotame, advantame and/or acesulfame potassium-k can impair your appetite regulation and cause weight gain

This article was previously published February 6, 2019, and has been updated with new information.

Sucralose (sold under the brand names Splenda, Splenda Zero, Zero-Cal, Sukrana, Apriva, SucraPlus, Candys, Cukren and Nevella, to name a few) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 19981 as a tabletop sweetener and for use in products such as baked goods, nonalcoholic beverages, chewing gum, frozen dairy desserts, fruit juices and gelatins. It is also permitted as a general-purpose sweetener for all processed foods.

In the European Union, sucralose is known under the additive code E955.2 However, this artificial sweetener, like aspartame before it, was approved based on extremely limited evidence of safety, and studies published in the years since it was brought to market confirm early suspicions, showing it is not an inert substance after all, and that it accumulates in body fat, disrupts your gut microbiome, and causes metabolic dysregulation and associated health problems.

Splenda Was Approved With Near-Nonexistent Evidence of Safety

The FDA claims it approved sucralose after reviewing more than 110 animal and human safety studies. What they don’t tell you is that of these 110 studies,3 only two human trials were actually published before the FDA approved sucralose for human consumption.

These two human trials had a grand total of 36 subjects, only 23 of whom were actually given sucralose, and the longest lasted just four days and looked at sucralose in relation to tooth decay, not human tolerance.4

What’s more, the absorption of sucralose into the human body was studied on a grand total of eight men.5 Based on that study, the FDA allowed the findings to be generalized as being representative of the entire human population, including women, children, the elderly and those with any chronic illness — none of whom was ever examined.

These studies are hardly indicative of what might happen to someone consuming sucralose in multiple products every single day for years or a lifetime. In my book, “Sweet Deception,” I explain how some of the animal studies also raised questions about the product’s safety, showing:6

  • Decreased red blood cells (a sign of anemia) at levels above 1,500 mg/kg/day
  • Increased male infertility by interfering with sperm production and vitality, as well as brain lesions at higher doses
  • Spontaneous abortions in nearly half the rabbit population given sucralose, compared to zero aborted pregnancies in the control group
  • A 23 percent death rate in rabbits, compared to a 6 percent death rate in the control group

I knew the approval of sucralose was a serious mistake, which is why I wrote “Sweet Deception” in 2006, despite the fact Johnson & Johnson threatened to sue me if the book went to publication. Since then, many new studies have confirmed my warnings, showing artificial sweeteners confuse your metabolism and cause biochemical distortions that can result in weight gain, metabolic dysfunction and other health problems.

Sucralose ‘Should Carry a Big Red Warning Label’

Sucralose has been found to be particularly damaging to your gut. Research7 published in 2008 found it reduces gut bacteria by 50 percent, preferentially targeting bacteria known to have important human health benefits. Consuming as few as seven little Splenda packets may be enough to have a detrimental effect on your gut microbiome.

The study also found it increases the pH level in your intestines, and is absorbed into and accumulates in fat tissue. In response to this study, James Turner, chairman of the national consumer education group Citizens for Health, issued the following statement:8

“The report makes it clear that the artificial sweetener Splenda and its key component sucralose pose a threat to the people who consume the product. Hundreds of consumers have complained to us about side effects from using Splenda, and this study … confirms that the chemicals in the little yellow package should carry a big red warning label.”

All Artificial Sweeteners Are Toxic to Your Gut Bacteria

More recent research confirmed these findings, and expanded them to all currently approved artificial sweeteners. The animal study,9 published in the journal Molecules in October 2018, found aspartame, sucralose, saccharin, neotame, advantame and acesulfame potassium-k all cause DNA damage in, and interfere with, the normal and healthy activity of gut bacteria.

As reported by Business Insider,10 the research team concluded that all of these sweeteners “had a toxic, stressing effect, making it difficult for gut microbes to grow and reproduce,” and that by being toxic to gut bacteria can have an adverse effect on human health.

Aside from the countless side effects associated with an impaired gut microbiome, the researchers warn it may also affect your body’s ability to process regular sugar and other carbohydrates.

Sucralose Is Not an Inert Compound

Research has also demonstrated that sucralose is not a biologically inert compound, as claimed. In the 2013 paper,11 “Sucralose, a Synthetic Organochloride Sweetener: Overview of Biological Issues,” the authors state, in part:

“Sucralose and one of its hydrolysis products were found to be mutagenic at elevated concentrations in several testing methods … Both human and rodent studies demonstrated that sucralose may alter glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 levels. Taken together, these findings indicate that sucralose is not a biologically inert compound.”

According to this paper, the acceptable daily intake set for sucralose may in fact be hundreds of times too high to ensure safety. Importantly, the study also notes that “Cooking with sucralose at high temperatures … generates chloropropanols, a potentially toxic class of compounds.”

Yet, Splenda’s makers recommend it for cooking and baking.12 Plus, sucralose is often used in processed foods in which high heat was involved. Chloropropanols, which are still poorly understood, are thought to have adverse effects on your kidneys and may have carcinogenic effects.13

Researchers Called for New Safety Review in 2018

Another industry claim that has been demolished by science is that sucralose passes unmetabolized through your body and therefore has no biological effects. Alas, research14,15 published in the online version of the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health August 21, 2018, shows it is in fact metabolized and that it accumulates in fat cells.

Here, 10 rats were given an average dose of 80.4 mg of sucralose per kilo per day (k/day) for 40 days. According to the researchers, this dosage is “within the range utilized in historical toxicology studies submitted for regulatory approval in North America, Europe and Asia.”

Urine and feces were collected daily from each rat, and were analyzed using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS/MS), which “revealed two new biotransformation products that have not previously been reported.”

The two metabolites are acetylated forms of sucralose that are lipophilic, meaning they dissolve in and combine with fats. Sucralose itself is far less lipophilic, which has been part of the safety argument. According to the authors:

“These metabolites were present in urine and feces throughout the sucralose dosing period and still detected at low levels in the urine 11 days after discontinuation of sucralose administration and six days after sucralose was no longer detected in the urine or feces.

The finding of acetylated sucralose metabolites in urine and feces do not support early metabolism studies, on which regulatory approval was based, that claimed ingested sucralose is excreted unchanged (i.e., not metabolized).

The historical metabolic studies apparently failed to detect these metabolites in part because investigators used a methanol fraction from feces for analysis along with thin layer chromatography and a low-resolution linear radioactivity analyzer.

Further, sucralose was found in adipose tissue in rats two weeks after cessation of the 40-day feeding period even though this compound had disappeared from the urine and feces.”

So, not only is sucralose metabolized, but it turns out these metabolites accumulate in your fat tissues, where they remain for “an extended period of time” after you stop consuming sucralose. In all, these findings led the authors to conclude:

“These new findings of metabolism of sucralose in the gastrointestinal tract and its accumulation in adipose tissue were not part of the original regulatory decision process for this agent and indicate that it now may be time to revisit the safety and regulatory status of this organochlorine artificial sweetener.”

Sucralose Linked to Liver, Kidney and Thymus Damage

Another study16 published online August 2, 2018, in the journal Morphologie, found sucralose caused “definite changes” in the liver of treated rats, “indicating toxic effects on regular ingestion.” The researchers warn these findings suggest sucralose should be “taken with caution to avoid hepatic damage.”

In other words, regularly using Splenda could damage your liver. Here, adult rats were given a much higher (yet nonlethal) oral dose of sucralose — 3 grams (3,000 mg) per kilo body mass per day for 30 days, after which the animals’ livers were dissected and compared to the livers of unexposed controls. According to the authors:

“Experimental rats showed features of patchy degeneration of hepatocytes along with Kupffer cells hyperplasia, lymphocytic infiltration, sinusoidal dilatation and fibrosis indicating a definite hepatic damage on regular ingestion of sucralose. Sinusoidal width was also found to be increased in experimental animals as compared to controls.”

Earlier research has also linked sucralose consumption to liver and kidney enlargement17,18 and kidney calcification.19,20 Another organ affected by sucralose is your thymus, with studies linking sucralose consumption to shrinkage of the thymus (up to 40 percent21,22) and an increase in leukocyte populations (immune system cells) in the thymus and lymph nodes.23

Sucralose Raises Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Like all other artificial sweeteners, sucralose is commonly used by diabetics who need to limit their sugar consumption. However, research again shows you simply cannot trick your body with calorie-free sweetness. Research24 published in 2013 revealed sucralose alters glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 levels and responses, which raises your risk for Type 2 diabetes.

It confirmed that, compared to controls, obese patients using sucralose experienced a greater incremental increase in peak plasma concentrations of glucose, a greater incremental increase in insulin and peak insulin secretion rate, along with a decrease in insulin clearance.

According to the authors, “These data demonstrate that sucralose affects the glycemic and insulin responses to an oral glucose load in obese people who do not normally consume non-nutritive sweeteners.”

Lots of Studies Question Safety of Sucralose

As of January 2022, there are 22,500 references to sucralose in the scientific search engine Google Scholar, so there’s no shortage of studies to review for those who are curious. Here’s a small sampling with a focus on more recent papers showing sucralose may be harmful to your health:

Potential Metabolic Effect of Sucralose Following an Oral Glucose Load in Subjects With Obesity and Normal-Weight Subjects, 201825  This food science and human nutrition master’s degree thesis notes sucralose “may have adverse effects on glucose metabolism in people with obesity, which is the group that most frequently consumes non-nutritive sweeteners to facilitate weight management.”The findings also highlight the role of sweetness perception in glucose homeostasis, “which supports the notion that sweetness, regardless of an associated caloric contribution, should be consumed in moderation.”
The Artificial Sweetener Splenda Promotes Gut Proteobacteria, Dysbiosis, and Myeloperoxidase Reactivity in Crohn’s Disease–Like Ileitis, 201826,27  This study found Splenda consumption may exacerbate gut inflammation and intensify symptoms in people with Crohn’s disease by promoting harmful gut bacteria.A letter28 to the editor argued against the findings, but at least one of the protesting writers, V. Lee Grotz, works for the company that owns Splenda.29,30
Pharmacokinetics of Sucralose and Acesulfame-Potassium in Breast Milk Following Ingestion of Diet Soda, 201831  This study found sucralose shows up in breast milk after consumption. Considering the effects of sucralose on beneficial gut bacteria, organ health and metabolism, this is a rather crucial piece of information for pregnant women as it may have significant ramifications for their baby’s health.Other research32 shows sucralose is so ubiquitous it’s even found in groundwater and sanitary wastewater. It persists through sewage treatment, and may therefore be present in your drinking water as well.
Artificial Sweetener such as Sucralose May Promote Inflammation in Human Subcutaneous Fat-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells, 201733  Research presented at GW Annual Research Days in 2017 shows sucralose consumption caused an increase in superoxide accumulation and cellular inflammation.The sweetener also increased expression of a specific sweet taste receptor. According to the researchers, “upregulation of adipogenic genes … cultured in near physiological concentrations of sucralose, indicate possible causality between increased fat deposition and sweetener use.”
The Effect of Sucralose on Flavor Sweetness in Electronic Cigarettes Varies Between Delivery Devices, 201734  Sucralose is found in a wide variety of products, and not just food. It’s also commonly added to drugs, often without being listed on the label, and even e-cigarette liquids.This study found sucralose contributes sweet taste only when used in a cartridge system, and chemical analysis showed the use of a cartridge system also raised the concentration of sucralose in the aerosol.According to the authors, “Together these findings indicate that future regulation of sweet flavor additives should focus first on the volatile constituents of e-liquids with the recognition that artificial sweeteners may also contribute to flavor sweetness depending upon e-cigarette design.”While this study did not look at health effects, previous research35 has shown sucralose, when heated, releases potentially carcinogenic chloropropanols,36 which are part of a class of toxins known as dioxins.
Chronic Sucralose or L-Glucose Ingestion Does Not Suppress Food Intake, 201737  This study demonstrated that when sucralose is consumed along with a low-carbohydrate diet, it “causes a pronounced increase in calories consumed.” In other words, it increases hunger and promotes overeating.
Gut Microbiome Response to Sucralose and Its Potential Role in Inducing Liver Inflammation in Mice, 201738  Echoing the research discussed earlier in this article, this study also found that sucralose alters “the developmental dynamics of the gut microbiome,” and that the sweetener may thus play a role in chronic inflammation.
The Non-Caloric Sweeteners Aspartame, Sucralose and Stevia sp. Induce Specific but Differential Responses to Compartmentalized Adipose Tissue Accumulation, 201739  In this study, consumption of sucralose resulted in weight gain, elevated blood glucose and body fat accumulation.
Sucralose Activates an ERK1/2–Ribosomal Protein S6 Signaling Axis, 201640  Sucralose was found to stimulate insulin secretion much like glucose, but through completely different and poorly understood pathways. According to the authors, these findings “will have implications for diabetes.”
Sucralose Promotes Food Intake through NPY and a Neuronal Fasting Response, 201641  Here, sucralose consumption was again linked to increased hunger and food intake. According to the authors, “dietary sucralose creates a sweet/energy imbalance,” which in turn “activates a conserved neuronal starvation response.”
Changes in the Expression of Cell Surface Markers in Spleen Leukocytes in a Murine Model of Frequent Sucralose Intake, 201642  This study found frequent sucralose intake may affect your immune function. According to the authors:“Our results show a decrease in the frequency of B lymphocyte population and T lymphocytes in comparison to the control group. In B and T lymphocytes the analysis of co-stimulatory molecules show a lower frequency compared to the control group. The immune response depends on the differentiation and activation of cellular populations.We hypothesized that chronic ingestion of commercial sucralose might be affecting the immune response by modifying the frequencies of cellular populations, as well as the expression of co-stimulatory and inhibitory molecules … by decreasing the ability of co-stimulation between B an T lymphocytes, with a probable effect on the immune response.It is necessary to further determine if sucralose intake affects the efficiency of the immune response.”
Sucralose Administered in Feed, Beginning Prenatally Through Lifespan, Induces Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Mice, 201643  This study is significant as it specifically refutes industry claims that sucralose is not carcinogenic. As noted by the authors:“Long-term carcinogenicity bioassays on rats and mice conducted on behalf of the manufacturer have failed to show the evidence of carcinogenic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the carcinogenic effect of sucralose in mice, using a sensitive experimental design.We found a significant dose-related increased incidence of males bearing malignant tumors and a significant dose-related increased incidence of hematopoietic neoplasias in males, in particular at the dose levels of 2,000 ppm and 16,000 ppm.These findings do not support previous data that sucralose is biologically inert. More studies are necessary to show the safety of sucralose, including new and more adequate carcinogenic bioassay on rats. Considering that millions of people are likely exposed, follow-up studies are urgent.”
Effects of Splenda in Experimental Crohn’s Disease, 201444  As in later studies, this one found Splenda may exacerbate symptoms of Crohn’s disease by augmenting “inflammatory activity at the biochemical level” and altering microbial-host interactions within the intestinal mucosa.
Sucralose Affects Glycemic and Hormonal Responses to an Oral Glucose Load, 201345  Here, sucralose was found to affect the glycemic and insulin responses in obese individuals who normally did not consume non-nutritive sweeteners. Compared to controls, sucralose ingestion caused a greater incremental increase in peak plasma glucose concentrations, greater increase in insulin, greater peak insulin secretion and a decrease in the insulin clearance rate.
Sucralose, A Synthetic Organochlorine Sweetener: Overview of Biological Issues, 201346  This review highlights a number of health effects associated with sucralose, including alterations in P-glycoprotein levels, which could result in medications used in chemotherapy, AIDS treatment and treatments for heart conditions being shunted back into the intestines, rather than being absorbed by your body; alterations in the microbial composition in your gastrointestinal tract; mutagenic effects and more.
Popular Sweetener Sucralose as a Migraine Trigger, 200647  As noted by the authors, “This observation of a potential causal relationship between sucralose and migraines may be important for physicians to remember this can be a possible trigger during dietary history taking.Identifying further triggers for migraine headaches, in this case sucralose, may help alleviate some of the cost burden (through expensive medical therapy or missed work opportunity) as well as provide relief to migraineurs.”

Sucralose Safety Studies Nearly Always Produced by Industry

So, what about studies that support Splenda’s safety? A hallmark of such studies is that they’re overwhelmingly done or funded by industry. Following is a sampling of oft-cited studies ostensibly showing that sucralose is safe. As you will see, many of these have conflicts of interest that likely taint their findings, as one or more of the authors have close ties to the industry.

Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, 201748  This study came to the conclusion that “The collective evidence supports that sucralose has no effect on A1c or glycemic control.”Conflict of Interest — The lead author, V. Lee Grotz, is the director of global medical and safety science for Heartland Products Group, which owns Splenda. She also previously worked as director of product safety at McNeil Nutritionals (now Johnson & Johnson), which markets and sells Splenda.
Food and Chemical Toxicology, 201749  This review, based on an “extensive database of research” concluded that “sucralose is safe for its intended use as a non-caloric sugar alternative.”Conflict of Interest — As reported by Marion Nestle,50 this so-called safety study “was commissioned by the Calorie Control Council,51 a trade association representing ‘manufacturers and suppliers of low- and reduced-calorie foods and beverages, including manufacturers and suppliers of more than two dozen different alternative sweeteners, fibers and other low-calorie, dietary ingredients.'”The authors are also affiliated with Health Science Consultants and Intertek. (One of the authors on this study is also an author on the Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology study above).According to Nestle, the Calorie Control Council has a vested interest in demonstrating that Splenda is safe, and the consultant groups have a vested interest in pleasing the Calorie Control Council.
Nutrition and Cancer, 201652  This scientific review concluded that “sucralose does not demonstrate carcinogenic activity even when exposure levels are several orders of magnitude greater than the range of anticipated daily ingestion levels.”Conflict of Interest — This is another industry-biased review by Grotz, director of global medical and safety science for Heartland Products Group, which owns Splenda, and former director of product safety at McNeil Nutritionals (now Johnson & Johnson) that markets and sells Splenda.
International Journal of Scientific Research, 201853  This is a rather confusing study showing weight gain in sucralose-treated rats, even though they didn’t eat any more than the control group.What’s confusing is that the study authors still concluded that sucralose is “safe at least for a period of one month in sublethal doses” even though they believe “the body weight gain after sucralose ingestion needs to be relooked and investigated further.”
American Journal of Physiology, 200954  This Australian study concluded sucralose “does not stimulate insulin, GLP-1 or glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide release or slow gastric emptying in healthy humans.”

Artificial Sweeteners Trick Your Body Into Storing Fat

Those who switch to artificial sweeteners are typically carrying extra pounds and/or are diabetic, or prone to these conditions. Unfortunately, this may be the absolute worst diet change you could implement if you’re overweight or diabetic.

Research has repeatedly shown that artificially sweetened no- or low-calorie drinks and other “diet” foods tend to stimulate your appetite, increase cravings for carbs, stimulate fat storage and weight gain, and promote insulin resistance and diabetes.

There are a number of different reasons for this. First of all, artificial sweeteners basically trick your body into thinking that it’s going to receive sugar (calories), but when the sugar doesn’t arrive, your body signals that it needs more, which results in carb cravings.

This connection between sweet taste and increased hunger can be found in the medical literature going back at least three decades. Following is another sampling of studies looking specifically at the connection between artificial sweeteners — sucralose and others — and weight gain. Repeatedly, studies have shown artificial sweeteners increase your risk of unwanted weight gain, oftentimes to the same or greater degree than regular sugar.

So, if weight control is the reason you’re using these products, you’d be wise to reconsider. Based on the evidence, you’d be better off consuming regular sugar when you want sweet taste. Alternatively, opt for one of the sweeteners discussed at the very end of this article.

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 201555  Seniors aged 65 and over were followed for an average of nine years, and there was a “striking dose-response relationship” between diet soda consumption and waist circumference. This held true even when other factors such as exercise, diabetes and smoking were taken into account.People who never drank diet soda increased their waist circumference by an average of 0.8 inches during the nine-year observation period. Occasional diet soda drinkers added an average of 1.83 inches to their waist line in that time period. Daily diet soda drinkers gained an average of nearly 3.2 inches —quadruple that of those who abstained from diet soda altogether.
PLOS One 201456  This study, which was done on rats, using aspartame, also found an increased risk of glucose intolerance. Animals that consumed artificial sweeteners ended up with raised levels of propionate — short-chain fatty acids involved in sugar production. Consumption of artificial sweeteners shifted gut microbiota to produce propionate, which generated higher blood sugar levels.
Nature 201457  This important study was able to clearly show causality, revealing there’s a direct cause and effect relationship between consuming artificial sweeteners and developing elevated blood sugar levels. People who consumed high amounts of artificial sweeteners were found to have higher levels of HbA1C — a long-term measure of blood sugar — compared to nonusers or occasional users of artificial sweeteners.Seven volunteers who did not use artificial sweeteners were then recruited, and asked to consume the equivalent of 10 to 12 single-dose packets of artificial sweeteners daily for one week. Four of the seven people developed “significant disturbances in their blood glucose,” according to the researchers.Some became prediabetic within just a few days. The reason for this dramatic shift was traced back to alterations in gut bacteria. Some bacteria were killed off, while others started proliferating.
The Journal of Physiology 201358,59  This study demonstrated that your body is not fooled by sweet taste without accompanying calories, which is yet another reason why artificial sweeteners promote obesity.When you eat something sweet, your brain releases dopamine, which activates your brain’s reward center. The appetite-regulating hormone leptin is also released, which eventually informs your brain that you are “full” once a certain amount of calories have been ingested.When you consume something that tastes sweet but doesn’t contain any calories, your brain’s pleasure pathway still gets activated by the sweet taste, but there’s nothing to deactivate it, since the calories never arrive. Artificial sweeteners basically trick your body into thinking that it’s going to receive calories, but when the calories fail to arrive, your body continues to signal that it needs more, which results in carb cravings.
Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism 201360  This report highlights the fact that diet soda drinkers suffer the same exact health problems as those who opt for regular soda, such as excessive weight gain, Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke.61 The researchers speculate that frequent consumption of artificial sweeteners may induce metabolic derangements.
Appetite 201262  Here, researchers showed that saccharin and aspartame cause greater weight gain than sugar, even when the total caloric intake remains similar.
In 2011, the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio publicized the results of two studies, saying:63“In the constant battle to lose inches or at least stay the same, we reach for the diet soda. Two studies presented [June 25, 2011] at the American Diabetes Association’s Scientific Sessions suggest this might be self-defeating behavior.Epidemiologists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio reported data showing that diet soft drink consumption is associated with increased waist circumference in humans, and a second study that found aspartame raised fasting glucose (blood sugar) in diabetes-prone mice …Diet soft drink users, as a group, experienced 70 percent greater increases in waist circumference compared with nonusers [Editor’s note: the study was 10 years long]. Frequent users, who said they consumed two or more diet sodas a day, experienced waist circumference increases that were 500 percent greater than those of nonusers.‘Data from this and other prospective studies suggest that the promotion of diet sodas and artificial sweeteners as healthy alternatives may be ill-advised,’ said Helen P. Hazuda, Ph.D., professor and chief of the Division of Clinical Epidemiology in the School of Medicine. ‘They may be free of calories but not of consequences.'”
Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine 201064  This review offers a summary of epidemiological and experimental evidence concerning the effects of artificial sweeteners on weight, and explains those effects in light of the neurobiology of food reward. More than 11,650 children aged 9 to 14 were included in this study.Each daily serving of diet beverage was associated with a BMI increase of 0.16 kg/m2. It also shows the correlation between increased usage of artificial sweeteners in food and drinks, and the corresponding rise in obesity.artificial sweetener use and obesitySource: Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine June 8, 2010,: v83(2)According to the authors:“[F]indings suggest that the calorie contained in natural sweeteners may trigger a response to keep the overall energy consumption constant … Increasing evidence suggests that artificial sweeteners do not activate the food reward pathways in the same fashion as natural sweeteners … [A]rtificial sweeteners, precisely because they are sweet, encourage sugar craving and sugar dependence.”
The Journal of Pediatrics 200665  The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study followed 2,371 girls aged 9 to 19 for 10 years. Soda consumption in general, both regular and diet, was associated with increase in total daily energy intake.
Journal of the American College of Nutrition 200566  In this two-year-long study, which involved 166 school children, increased diet soda consumption was associated with higher BMI at the end of the trial.
San Antonio Heart Study 200567  Data gathered from the San Antonio Heart Study, which went on for 25 years, showed drinking diet soft drinks increased the likelihood of serious weight gain far more so than regular soda.68 On average, for each diet soft drink the participants drank per day, they were 65 percent more likely to become overweight during the next seven to eight years, and 41 percent more likely to become obese.
International Journal of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders 200469  This Purdue University study found that rats fed artificially sweetened liquids ate more high-calorie food than rats fed high-caloric sweetened liquids. The researchers believe the experience of drinking artificially sweetened liquids disrupted the animals’ natural ability to compensate for the calories in the food.
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition 200370 — This study, which looked at 3,111 children, found that diet soda, specifically, was associated with higher body mass index (BMI).
Journal of the American Dietetic Association 199171  In a study of artificial sweeteners performed on college students, there was no evidence that artificial sweetener use was associated with a decrease in their overall sugar intake either.
Physiology and Behavior 199072  Here, they found that aspartame had a time-dependent effect on appetite, “producing a transient decrease followed by a sustained increase in hunger ratings.”
Physiology and Behavior, 198873  In this study, they determined that no- or low-calorie sweeteners can produce significant changes in appetite. Of the three sweeteners tested, aspartame produced the most pronounced effects.
Preventive Medicine 198674  This study examined nearly 78,700 women aged 50 to 69 for one year. Artificial sweetener usage increased with relative weight, and users were significantly more likely to gain weight compared to those who did not use artificial sweeteners, regardless of their initial weight.According to the researchers, the results “were not explicable by differences in food consumption patterns. The data do not support the hypothesis that long-term artificial sweetener use either helps weight loss or prevents weight gain.”

Commonly Reported Splenda Side Effects

Scores of people have reported side effects from using Splenda, ranging from mild to severe. The following are common symptoms, usually noticed within a 24-hour period following consumption of a Splenda product:

Skin — Redness, itching, swelling, blistering, weeping, crusting, rash, eruptions or hives (itchy bumps or welts)
Lungs — Wheezing, tightness, cough or shortness of breath
Head — Swelling of the face, eyelids, lips, tongue or throat; headaches and migraines (severe headaches)
Nose — Stuffy nose, runny nose (clear, thin discharge), sneezing
Eyes — Red (bloodshot), itchy, swollen or watery
Stomach — Bloating, gas, pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea
Heart — Palpitations or fluttering
Joints — Joint pains or aches
Neurological — Anxiety, dizziness, spaced-out sensation, depression

Report Reactions to Splenda and Other Artificial Sweeteners

To determine if you’re having a reaction to artificial sweeteners — be it Splenda, aspartame or any of the others — take the following steps:

  1. Eliminate all artificial sweeteners from your diet for two weeks
  2. After two weeks, reintroduce your artificial sweetener of choice in a significant quantity (about three servings daily)
  3. Avoid other artificial sweeteners during this period
  4. Do this for one to three days and take notice of how you feel, especially as compared to when you were abstaining from artificial sweeteners
  5. If you don’t notice a difference in how you feel after reintroducing your primary artificial sweetener for a few days, it’s a safe bet you’re able to tolerate it acutely, meaning your body doesn’t have an immediate, adverse response. Just know that this doesn’t mean your health won’t be damaged in the long run
  6. If you’ve been consuming more than one type of artificial sweetener, repeat steps 2 through 4 with the next sweetener on your list

If you do experience side effects from an artificial sweetener (or any other food additive for that matter), please report it to the FDA (if you live in the U.S.). It’s easy to make a report — just go to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator page, find the phone number for your state, and make a call to report your reaction.

Keep in mind that some medications may contain sucralose as well, even if it’s not listed on the label. If you continue to experience any of the symptoms above even though you’re avoiding Splenda and other artificial sweeteners, then it may be worth investigating whether any of the medications you’re taking contain artificial sweeteners.

Healthier Sugar Substitutes

Two of the best sugar substitutes are from the plant kingdom: Stevia and Lo Han Kuo (also spelled Luo Han Guo). Stevia, a highly sweet herb derived from the leaf of the South American stevia plant, is sold as a supplement. It’s completely safe in its natural form and can be used to sweeten most dishes and drinks.

Lo Han Kuo is similar to Stevia, but is my personal favorite. I use the Lakanto brand vanilla flavor which is a real treat for me. The Lo Han fruit has been used as a sweetener for centuries, and it’s about 200 times sweeter than sugar.

A third alternative is to use pure glucose, also known as dextrose. Dextrose is only 70 percent as sweet as sucrose, so you’ll end up using a bit more of it for the same amount of sweetness, making it slightly more expensive than regular sugar. Still, it’s well worth it for your health as it does not contain any fructose whatsoever. Contrary to fructose, glucose can be used directly by every cell in your body and as such is a far safer sugar alternative.

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Sugar and the Brain

Excerpted from Natural Brain Health by Michael Edson, MS, L.Ac.

With consumption of soft drinks and candy, Americans consume an enormous amount of sugar, the equivalent of more than seven tablespoons daily. This amount of sugar is about 355 calories. We are in the midst of a crisis of obesity in the U.S. and the consumption of sweet foods is part of the problem.

The brain uses more energy than any other organ in the human body and glucose is its source of fuel.  In the adult brain, neurons have the highest energy demand,[i] requiring continuous delivery of glucose from blood. The main process by which this is accomplished is called glycolysis. Glucose provides precursors for neurotransmitter synthesis and ATP to fuel their actions. Glucose is also required for the brain’s energy demands unrelated to signaling.[ii]

However, too much glucose is toxic to brain cells. This is a problem worsened by the fact that regular intake of sugar has drug-like effects in the reward center of the brain, creating a desire for more sugar. High blood glucose levels can negatively affect the brain in a number of ways:

  1. It reduces functional connectivity of the default mode network, that system of the brain which links the individual with the outside world.[iii] Such altered functionality is associated with cognitive impairments.
  2. It can cause the brain to atrophy or shrink[iv] as does deteriorating brain glucose metabolism[v]
  3. It can lead to cerebral small vessel disease which restricts blood flow in the brain which can result in cognitive difficulties and, if severe enough, can cause vascular dementia.[vi]

High Blood Sugar

The body needs insulin to carry glucose into the brain. Excess sugar (and refined carbohydrate intake) over time can result in insulin insensitivity (requiring the body to make more insulin) contributing the type-2 diabetes. The effects of glucose and other forms of sugar on the brain may be the most profound in diabetes.

Research strongly supports the fact that people without diabetes but with above normal blood sugar levels have an increased risk of developing dementia.[vii] There is a relationship between the breakdown of glycolysis and Alzheimer’s disease,[viii] the severity of which is linked to the severity of Alzheimer’s pathology. Lower rates of glycolysis and higher brain glucose levels correlate to more severe plaques and tangles in the brains of people with the disease. Enzymes, amino acids serine, glycine, and alanine are essential parts of glycolysis, and are lower in Alzheimer’s cases compared to normal brain tissue samples.[ix] In addition, lower enzyme activity is associated with more severe Alzheimer’s pathology in the brain and the development of symptoms.

Hypoglycemia is a common complication of diabetes caused by low glucose levels in the blood. This can lead to loss of energy for brain function and is linked to poor attention and cognitive function.

Inflammation

Sweeteners of all kinds contribute to inflammation. Sugar is one of the most acidic foods, and excess sugar in one’s diet is considered a leading contributor to disease, such as type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure (hypertension), cancer, and dementia.[x]

Why Reduce Sugar

There are many reasons to reduce sugar intake.

  • Metabolic stability. When you eat or drink something sweet, it gives a quick surge of energy. However, the consequence of glucose entering the bloodstream so quickly is that the body’s ability to maintain stability is compromised.
  • Stable blood sugar levels. With some attention to our diet, we can help balance blood sugar. This is especially true in type-2 diabetes (adult onset), which sometimes can be managed by diet alone. It is rarely true of type 1 diabetes (juvenile onset).
  • Stronger immune system. Individuals with higher sugar consumption had shorter telomeres in their white blood cells as compared to those with lower sugar consumption (telomeres are the caps at the end of each strand of DNA that protect our chromosomes, like the plastic tips at the end of shoelaces).[xi]

Reduced glycation. Glycation is the binding of sugar and protein molecules in one’s body, and is part of the natural aging process. When the sugar molecule binds inappropriately to a protein, it forms a new compound called “advanced glycation end-products (AGE’s).” AGE’s cause ongoing inflammation and react with body tissues to produce free radicals and reactive oxygen species that damage healthy cells if not neutralized.

Recommended

Limit your sweets and avoid sugary drinks and sodas. In general, an alkaline diet will be a low sugar diet and will be anti-inflammatory. Avoid high glycemic index foods. Stevia is a great alternative to sugar and has been shown to be very safe.[i] It is an herb that is not sugar (has zero calories) and works by stimulating the sugar receptors in the tongue. Stevia is two-hundred times sweeter than sugar taken in the same dosages, so a small amount (even 3-5 drops in plain yogurt for example) goes a long way. Too much stevia gives food a bitter taste.

Reduce AGE’s. In addition to the above, avoid grilled and charred foods, fried foods, and slow cook your food or lightly steam your vegetables. Avoid vegetable oils for cooking in high heat. Olive oil is fine in low heat, saturated fats such as butter and coconuts oil have high heat tolerance which means that these oils when used in cooking maintain stability whereas oils such as vegetable oils have poor heat tolerance and can be quickly turned into an unhealthy oil high in free radicals when used in cooking. Complex carbohydrates and high fiber foods reduce the production of AGE’s in the body. Foods that help clear one’s body of AGE’s include kale, collard greens, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, citrus fruits, peaches, most berries, tomatoes, carrots, as well as green tea, grapeseed extract, carnosine, and vitamin B6.

Avoid artificial sweeteners. Sugar and artificially sweetened beverage intake have been linked to cardiometabolic risk factors, which increase the risk of cerebrovascular disease and dementia. Artificially-sweetened soft drinks are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, all-cause dementia, and AD dementia.[ii] [iii] Some of the adverse effects on the central nervous system caused by the intake of aspartame are headaches, mood changes, insomnia and seizures.[iv] Other effects include confusion, personality disorders, dizziness and visual difficulty.[v] In mice studies, chronic aspartame consumption resulted in a longer time for the mice to locate the reward within the T-maze, which showed impaired long-term memory retention.[vi] [vii] [viii]

Ironically, although people consume artificial sweeteners in an attempt to reduce caloric intake and control or lose weight, studies actually show that consumption results in increased weight and has been attributed to obesity.[ix] [x] One reason may be that consumption of foods and fluids containing high-potency sweeteners interfered with the ability to detect sweet taste, thereby affecting energy regulation (and possibly increasing the desire for more sweets, or stimulating the desire for sugar).[xi]


[i] Ashwell M. (2015). Stevia, Nature’s Zero-Calorie Sustainable Sweetner: A New Player in the Fight Against Obesity. Nutr Today. May; 50(3):129–134.

[ii]Pass MP, Himali JJ, Beiser AS, Aparicio HJ, Satizabal CL, et al. (2017). Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages and the Risks of Incident Stroke and Dementia: A Prospective Cohort Study. Stroke. May;48(5):1139–1146.

[iii] Gorelick PB, Scuteri A, Black SE, Decarli C, Greenberg SM, et al. (2011). Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia: a statement for healthcare professionals from the american heart association/american stroke association. Stroke. Sep; 42(9):2672-713.

[iv] Romano M, Diomede L, Guiso G, Caccia S, Perego C, et al. (1990). Plasma and brain kenetics of large neutral amino acids and striatum monoamines in rats given aspartame. Food Chem Toxicol. May;28(5):317-321.

[v] Pepino MY. (2015). Metabois effects of non-nutritive sweeteners. Physio Behav. Dec 1;152(Pt B):450-5.

[vi] Christian B, McConnaughey K, Bethea E, Brantley S, Coffey A , et al. (2004). Chronic aspartame affects T-maze performance, brain cholinergic receptors and Na+,K+-ATPase in rats Pharmacol Biochem Behav. May;78(1):121-127.

[vii] Chattopadhyay S, Raychaudhuri U, Chakraborty R. (2014). Artificial sweeteners-a review. J Food Sci Technol. Apr;51(4):611-621.

[viii] Qurrat-ul-Ain, Khan SA. (2015). Artificial sweeteners: safe or unsafe? J Pak Med Assoc. Feb;65(2):225-227.

[ix] Fernstrom JD. (2015). Non-nutritive sweeteners and obesity. Annu Rev Food Sci Technol. 2015;6:119-136.

[x] Roberts JR. (2015). The paradox of artificial sweeteners in managing obesity. Curr Gastroenterol Rep. Jan;17(1):423.

[xi] Schiffman SS, Rother KI. (2013). Sucralose, a synthetic organochlorine sweetener: overview of biological issues J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2013;16(7):399-451  


[i] Howarth C, Gleeson P, Attwell D. (2013). Updated energy budgets for neural computation in the neocortex and cerebellum. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. Jul; 32(7):1222-32.

[ii] Dienel GA. (2012). Fueling and imaging brain activation. ASN Neuro.  Jul 20; 4(5):e00093.

[iii] Ishibashi K, Sakurai K, Shimoji K, Takumaru AM, Ishii K. (2018). Altered functional connectivity of the default mode network by glucose loading in young, healthy participants.

[iv] Walsh EI, Shaw M, Sachdev P, Anstey KJ, Cherbuin N. (2018). Brain atrophy in aging: Estimating effects of blood glucose levels vs. other type 2 diabetes effects. Diabetes Metab. Feb;44(1):80-83.

[v] Croteau E, Castellano CA, Fortier M, Bocti C, Fulop T, et al. (2018). A cross-sectional comparison of brain glucose and ketone metabolism in cognitively healthy older adults, mild cognitive impairment and early Alzheimer’s disease. Exp Gerontol. Jul 1;107:18-26.

[vi] Edwards S. (2019). Sugar and the Brain. Retrieved Jun 18 2019 from https://neuro.hms.harvard.edu/harvard-mahoney-neuroscience-institute/brain-newsletter/and-brain-series/sugar-and-brain.

[vii] Crane PK, Walker R, Hubbard RA, Li G, Nathan DM, et al. (2013). Glucose levels and risk of dementia. N Engl J Med. Aug 8;369(6):540-548.

[viii] An Y, Varma VR, Varma S, Casanova R, Dammer E, et al. (2018). Evidence for brain glucose dysregulation in Alzheimer’s disease. Mar;14(3):318-329.

[ix] An Y, Varma VR, Varma S, Casanova R, Dammer E, et al. (2018). Evidence for brain glucose dysregulation in Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimers Dement. Mar;14(3):318-329.

[x] Doheny K. (2012). Americans Sweet on Sugar: Time to Regulate? WebMD. Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20120201/americans-sweet-on-sugar-time-to-regulate#1

[xi] Leung CW, Laraia BA, Needham BL, Rehkopf DH, Adler NE, et al. (2014). Soda and cell aging: associations between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption an leukocyte telomere length in healthy adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Am J Public Health. Dec;104(12):2425-31.

Is Carrageenan Toxic to Us and Our Pets!

Carrageenan is a non-nutritive thickener and emulsifier that can make our pets and us ill. It can easily be replaced by safer alternatives in pet foods, including tomato paste, guar gum, potato starch, pea starch, tapioca, and garbanzo bean flour.

This food additive is derived from red algae or seaweeds and processed through an alkaline procedure to produce what many consider to be a “natural” food ingredient. Interestingly, if you prepare the same seaweed in an acidic solution, you get what is referred to as “degraded carrageenan” or poligeenan, well-known for its inflammatory properties. The difference between a disease-producing carrageenan and its “natural” food counterpart is literally just a few pH points. Not a single sample of products containing carrageenan that have been tested could be said to be free of the degraded form. 

Carrageenan is so toxic and inflaming to the human digestive system that this food additive is formally classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (part of the World Health Organization) as a potential human carcinogen. Scientists first discovered that carrageenan causes gut inflammation as far back as the 1960’s that leads to IBS, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and more. Studies from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s link food-grade carrageenan to higher rates of digestive disease, including colon cancer, in laboratory animals.

Pets that eat primarily wet food with carrageenan will consume daily doses of carrageenan in amounts known to cause inflammation. In fact, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in cats is the most common cause of vomiting and diarrhea. Most pet food contain this additive, even the ones you find in the health food stores so you must read labels. I switched last year to Pet Guard which is also non GMO.

New independent research (published in 2014) at the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center in Chicago,  demonstrates for the first time that carrageenan-induced inflammation occurs in both humans and mice, indicating that it is likely to cause a similar reaction in all mammals, including cats and dogs.

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Collagen and leaky gut

Since collagen is the most abundant protein in our body, it provides structure to skin, muscles, bone and connective tissue. But it lessens in abundance as we age decreasing by 1% per year after the age of 20. The body’s ability to produce collagen starts decreasing at 2% per year after age 30. We know that collagen is used to help with wrinkle control, sagging skin, brittle nails and hair as well as joint problems, but did you know it also can help with leaky gut?

One of the results of collagen depletion as we age is leaky guy syndrome. This is where the lining of the gut weakens and allows food toxins to seep into the bloodstream where the body treats them as foreigners and attacks them. This causes inflammation, food intolerance, skin rashes and auto immune issues. Collagen supplements have been used to improve the condition of the stomach lining by tightening and firming the digestive tract.

Foods that can help with collagen production are proline amino acids found in egg whites, meat, cheese, fermented soy and cabbage. Vitamin C can also help support collagen as well as vitamin A. So can blackberries, blueberries, cherries and raspberries because of their high anthocyanidin levels. Keeping your copper levels up such as found in 4 Easy Hydration, a liquid concentrate you can add to your water: ( www.EasyMenopauseSolutions.com ) can also help keep collagen levels boosted.

excerpted from: Collagen by Corinna Kaufman, Whole Foods Magazine Oct. 2017

 

Does your Stomach have Holiday Bloating?

foodWe all seem to eat too much or binge on booze or sugar during the holiday season. And many of us feel guilty and try to detox or diet January 2nd. But in the meantime what is happening inside your tummy?

Do you feel bloated, crampy, experience nausea? Do you keep antacids nearby and gobble them like candy? You may develop chronic indigestion, even if it’s just a seasonal condition. Rather than reach for the antacids, you may want to do something more natural like supplement with hydrochloric acid (HCL) which helps increase gastric production and assists the body while it’s regaining the ability to produce its own sufficient amounts of HCL.

If you continue to abuse your body with bad food choices, lack of vitamin C and E, you may encourage overgrowth of H. pylori which increases gastric pH and may put you on the road to ulcers. It seems that habitual use of antacids and acid blocking drugs may promote the overgrowth of H. Pylori. If you suspect you have this you may want to try eliminating the foods that contribute to gastric upset and investigate Mastic gum which has the ability to wipe out H. pylori in certain folks. You also can consider taking deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) which has shown to help heal both stomach and duodenal ulcers. It works by stimulating the normal defense mechanisms that prevent ulcer formation and helps protect the intestinal lining. Manuka honey is also a key player in attacking H. plyori as are garlic, pomegranate extract, oregano oil an d-limonene from lemons.

But, if you don’t want to have to go through all that, be aware what you are putting in your stomach this holiday season. And avoid those antacids – they are only temporary fixes anyway. Remember – when your stomach hurts, it means you gave it something it didn’t like – pay attention!

-To see our videos about Joint problems, Memory loss, Anti-aging, Stress and Sleep and more go to: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/whyweage

 

Best Tip for Dieting

Did you know that the most widely used tactics for dieting include:

  • Watching portion sizes (34%)
  • Controlling the total amount of food eaten (28%)
  • Reducing the amount of junk food (25%)
  • Monitoring calories (24%)
  • Getting rid of snacks (21%)
  • Reducing sugar (21%)
  • Taking weight loss supplements (over $2 billion spent annually)

Well, there is one way you can cut desire for many fattening foods but it takes a little will power.  We suggest you stop eating all forms of sugar or sweeteners for 10 days. For some reason this is the time it takes for your body to lose its addiction. I know this may be hard so in the meantime try using stevia (an herb) or sucking on a cinnamon stick. Do not substitute artificial sweeteners as not only are they unhealthy, but they will not let you detox the sweet tooth desire.

If you try this (we have and it works) please leave us a comment. And check out our new online course you can watch on vimeo with modules about Joint Health, Stress, Sleep, Memory Loss and more. Click Here for videos

Caffeine – good or bad for you? And, can it contribute to heart attacks?

This is our new video blog post….. it’s the first one of what will be an ongoing series regarding tips for good health and a happy lifestyle from Millennials to Grannies and Gramps too. We’re posting it here so you can see the format, but if you want to access others as we post them please go to our news site www.antiagingladyNEWS.com

Other videos in the pipeline are Which herbs work during flu season? and a cooking video on a quick meal that controls inflammation.

Can smart phones affect weight gain?

bluecellExposure to the type of blue light emitted by smartphones, computers, and tablets immediately before and after dinner increased hunger and impacted glucose metabolism in people who participated in a small Northwestern University study.

If true, this can inhibit your ability to diet successfully. We’ll see if further studies support this but we know that the blue light interrupts your melatonin production so if you are having trouble going to sleep… turn the computer and cell phone off at dinnertime.

-don’t forget to download your free copy of my new ebook: Think and Feel Younger. Click Here

Things in your drinks.

stadionrunneronlyWith many of us switching from carbonated soda pop to fruit, flavored water and tea drinks , we still have to be aware of ingredients. Some of those drinks are not organic, some may still use dyes or preservatives or sweeteners that are not good for your body even though the manufactures say they are safe in small amounts.

Coal tar derivatives used for coloring such as Red #40 and Yellow #6 can cause sensitivity to viruses and have been linked to cancer. Cochineal extract is used as a cola coloring and is basically ground up female cochineal bugs from South America. While this may not be appealing, we still don’t know if they are laden with critters or pesticides that could affect our health. Artificial sweeteners that go by several names now but started out as aspartame, when heated (like if left in your hot car in the summer) breaks down to toxic methyl alcohol. It has  been implicated in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s and can cause headaches and seizures in some people. AceK sounds safe enough but it has shown to cause cancer in animals. Sucralose is chlorinated sugar and has shown in studies to have a negative effect on the thymus gland, decreased red blood cell count, diarrhea among other potential conditions.

Agave is a sweetener in many natural foods drinks. The fructose content of agave syrup is much higher than that of high fructose corn syrup, which is of concern since some research has linked high fructose intake to weight gain (especially around the abdominal area), high triglycerides, heart disease and insulin resistance. And I’m sure by now you’ve read by blog posts on why to stay away from high fructose corn syrup (not the least is that it is GMO).

Chemicals such a Propylene glycol and ployethylene glycol (PEG) are sometimes added to drinks.  The former has shown to be toxic and induce seizures in epileptics as well as affect the heart. It also inhibits the growth of the friendly bacteria in your intestines leading to constipation. PEG is used as a drug to induce diarrhea before surgery. Now why would you want to have that in your drink? It also has shown to interfere with blood thinners, birth control pills, and antiinflammatories.

So, the next time you pick up that sports drink, protein shake, or health drink – read the label!

-excerpted from the book I wrote:  Analyzing Sports Drinks

PS. Don’t forget to get a FREE e-copy of my new book “Think and Feel Younger” Click Here

 

 

Can GMO food make us antibiotic resistant?

gmoGenetic engineering (GE) is the modification of an organism’s genetic composition by artificial means, often involving the transfer of specific traits, or genes, from one organism into a plant or animal of an entirely different species. When gene transfer occurs, the resulting organism is called transgenic or a GMO (genetically modified organism). Critics of genetic engineering believe that GE foods must be proven safe before they are sold to the public. Specific concerns over genetic engineering include:

Antibiotic resistance. Almost all GE foods contain antibiotic resistance marker genes that help producers know whether the new genetic material was transferred to the host plant or animal. GE food could make disease-causing bacteria even more resistant to antibiotics, which could increase the spread of disease throughout the world.

Allergic reactions. There are two concerns regarding allergic reactions. The first is with known allergens. For example, if genes from nuts are inserted into other foods, it could cause severe reactions in people with nut allergies. Therefore, there is concern that people with known allergies will not be aware that the genetically engineered food they are eating contains substances to which they are allergic. The second concern is that new allergies might be created, since new combinations of genes and traits have the potential to cause allergic reactions that have never existed before.

Loss of nutrition. Genetic engineering may change the nutritional value of food.

Foods that have been approved for GMO by the FDA but not necessarily in the grocery store yet are starred (*):  Alfalfa, Cherry Tomato*, Corn, Flax*, Papaya, Potato*, Rice*, Soybean, Squash, Sugar beet, Tomato*

More info: http://www.sustainabletable.org/264/genetic-engineering