Tag Archives: antiaging

Coronary problems, eye disease and homocysteine levels.

Homocysteine is a naturally occurring amino acid that is a breakdown product of the essential amino acid methionine. If your levels are high you may be at risk for coronary problems, cancer, deep vein thrombosis, stroke, kidney disease, hypothyroidism and reduced physical performance in older women. High levels also have been linked to aging eye disease such as macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy.

Normally homocysteine is converted into a harmless amino, cysteine or back into methionine but gluten sensitivity may increase the buildup and thwart its normal conversion. The usual problem is low B vitamins and low folate (B9)* which helps homocysteine normalize as well low levels of B6 and B12. Since stomach acid is required to produce B12 and adequate folic acid absorption, the aging body may suffer because they have reduced stomach acid. Also if you use acid-blocking heartburn drugs to reduce stomach acid that will affect your ability to process the B vitamins.

Routine blood tests can confirm B vitamin deficiencies but you should also ask to have your homocysteine levels checked. If low and if you have stomach acid problems you may want to supplement.

*folic acid is the synthetic version of  folate… not as good.

…Check out our sponsor for a liquid that contains the B complex vitamins: Daily Metrix  www.longlifenews.com

 

Advertisements

The Skinny on Protein Supplements

Even if you are not an athlete building muscle, you still may need a protein supplement. Vegetarians are always looking for a non-animal protein and some supplements have emerged to fit in that criteria.

Hemp protein is loaded with omega 3 and 6 essential fatty acids which for the aging population is necessary to guard against cardiovascular problems. 65% of hemp’s protein comes from globular protein edestin which is easily digested and absorbed. And it is not a controversial form of marijuana!  Peas are not normally considered a source of protein but sourced from yellow peas, pea protein is a great alternative to animal based protein. It has a mild taste and is gaining popularity among vegetarians. Soy protein is a great source but beware. If the soy is not fermented you may be unable to digest it and thereby release some toxins. This is the reason doctors warn against consuming soy if you are prone to cancer. On the other hand, fermented soy actually protects against cancer because the fermentation changes the digestibility and absorption thereby releasing the good cancer fighting components. Spirulina is a great veggie source of protein. As a super food it is approximately 65-71% complete protein and 85-95% digestible. Its amino acids are almost instantaneously absorbed by the body.

For those who can tolerate animal protein Whey is definitely the leader. It contains high biological value and is high in branch chain amino acids while being quickly absorbed. It comes in a whey concentrate or a whey isolate (which is slightly more potent).  Eggs have been known for their high protein content but many can’t tolerate eggs and many times doctors recommend against eggs for cardiovascular reasons. Milk proteins contain casein and whey and are loaded with amino acids. This type of protein is usually found in protein blend formulas. If you find one that is strictly casein, don’t expect instant absorption. It takes the body 5-7 hours to break down and utilize casein, but is valuable if you take it in the evening and let your body get proteinized while you sleep.

Protein powders are good supplements, especially if you like me, don’t eat red meat or drink milk. If you are interested in a good fermented soy powder that also has medicinal mushrooms and curcumin in it click here 

*excerpted in part from “The Wonderful World of Protein” by Mark Becker. Vitamin Retailer magazine June 2018.

 

 

Low magnesium may inhibit vitamin D

A review published in the Jnl of American Osteopathic Assn found that vitamin D cannot be metabolized without the body having high enough magnesium levels. Vitamin D can increase our calcium and phosphate levels but if your magnesium levels are low you may suffer from vascular calcification which is prevented by sufficient magnesium. This mineral also helps prevent osteoporosis attributed to low levels of vitamin D. Dr. Mohammed S. Razzaque, professor of pathology at Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine says ” without magnesium vitamin D is not really useful or safe.”

And, if you have enough magnesium you won’t need huge amounts of D. The RDA for magnesium is 420mg for men and 320 for women but our diet only gives us 50% of this. Foods high in refined grains, fat, phosphate and sugar contribute to magnesium deficiencies. Foods providing magnesium are almonds, bananas, beans, broccoli, brown rice, cashews, egg yolk, flaxseed, green veggies, milk, mushrooms, oatmeal, pumpkin and sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, sweet corn and whole grains. But unless you eat a lot of these it may be prudent to take a magnesium supplement. – reprinted in part from Nutraceutical World, April 2018.

*Note: the liquid vitamin complex I take contains 300 mg magnesium and 2500iu vit. D-3. www.LongLifeNews.com   (Vitality Combo)

How does fiber help prevent cancer?

Fiber is the super sponge in the body. When the liver processes carcinogenic toxins out of the blood they end up in the gut. In order to completely eliminate them from the body, something in the gut must absorb them. Enter: fiber!

If you eat sugar, white rice and starchy carbs you will not be able to facilitate this absorption. No sponges will be available to bind up the toxins which will then be reabsorbed. This means they will end up in circulation all over again doubling your carcinogenic exposure. Increased fiber can intercede and help remove them properly.

Fruit is a great fiber food with raspberries and pears being at the top of the list. Or you can add whole wheat pasta, barley, bran flakes and oats to your diet. Split peas, lentils and black beans are chock full of fiber as are artichokes and broccoli. Almonds are a high fiber nut and Two tablespoons of flaxseed provide about six grams of fiber and opposed to 1/4 cup of black beans to get the same amountWomen should try to eat at least 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day, while men should aim for 30 to 38 grams a day.

To facilitate a better working liver to help process those carcinogens out, you can take a potent curcumin supplement and also use milk thistle which also helps suppress the growth of blood vessels that feed cancer tumors.

For a good cancer preventive supplement that includes curcumin and medicinal mushrooms visit www.jivasupplements.org 

Collagen and leaky gut

Since collagen is the most abundant protein in our body, it provides structure to skin, muscles, bone and connective tissue. But it lessens in abundance as we age decreasing by 1% per year after the age of 20. The body’s ability to produce collagen starts decreasing at 2% per year after age 30. We know that collagen is used to help with wrinkle control, sagging skin, brittle nails and hair as well as joint problems, but did you know it also can help with leaky gut?

One of the results of collagen depletion as we age is leaky guy syndrome. This is where the lining of the gut weakens and allows food toxins to seep into the bloodstream where the body treats them as foreigners and attacks them. This causes inflammation, food intolerance, skin rashes and auto immune issues. Collagen supplements have been used to improve the condition of the stomach lining by tightening and firming the digestive tract.

Foods that can help with collagen production are proline amino acids found in egg whites, meat, cheese, fermented soy and cabbage. Vitamin C can also help support collagen as well as vitamin A. So can blackberries, blueberries, cherries and raspberries because of their high anthocyanidin levels. Keeping your copper levels up such as found in 4 Easy Hydration, a liquid concentrate you can add to your water: ( www.EasyMenopauseSolutions.com ) can also help keep collagen levels boosted.

excerpted from: Collagen by Corinna Kaufman, Whole Foods Magazine Oct. 2017

 

45 million women going through menopause

So many women suffering with menopause. That’s why I wrote my book Aaargh! Menopause. I still deal with post-menopause symptoms which have been mostly eliminated through various supplements, but many of my friends who are at that age are complaining about hot flashes, fatigue, mood swings, loss of interest in sex, joint pain and more. They just ask me… when does this stop?

Although the symptoms may lessen the effects of losing your estrogen and progesterone levels change our shape. I still deal with a fatter waist, shrinking spine so the skin rolls up around my middle because it has no place to go! And most women have arthritis to look forward to. Not a pretty picture!

There are lots of things you can do diet wise to clean up your act and stave off the inevitable demise of the body. One supplement I found is to shore up the telomeres which affect your DNA strands from shortening. Supposedly when then get real short you die. Cell Metrix is a synergistic herbal supplement to stimulate your cells, including stem cells at the molecular level. And it must have an ingredient that affects my serotonin because I call it my happy pill. When I take it I get more energy and can’t keep a frown on. I buy it through www.longlifenews.com

The other magic potion I take is 4 Easy Menopause. It seems it includes the NCC Factor (which I understand means naturally complete complex) that according to the website has inherent in the velvet antler ingredient, all components needed for hormone balancing, joint support, immune support, etc. Sort of a one-size fits all component. It also has milk calcium and an EFA complex from green lipped mussels.  Must work because my knees are better and I can still ski and ride my bike and my hot flashes (yup still got them 20 years after menopause) are hardly noticeable. Do your own research and check out their website www.EasyMenopauseSolutions.com

If you have any other recommendations I’d appreciate comments to this blog. We like to share anything that helps women (and the men who have to deal with menopausal women) during the post-fertility stage of their life.

-don’t forget if you want to read my book Aaargh! Menopause you can download it free at http://menopausebook.gr8.com

ED and a natural alternative to stimulating drugs

Dating back many centuries in Asia, men have used velvet antler to fight ED (erectile dysfunction). In that part of the world it is a considered a natural alternative to Viagra. Along with similar pharmaceuticals, Viagra may just solve impotence problems by causing the vasodilation of blood vessels connected to proper erectile function. The hormone-supporting constituents of velvet deer antler have the ability to stimulate the contractile muscle protein called myosin. By activating this protein you generate muscle stamina and improved nerve transmission, both of which help to restore a more normal sexual function in men and women.

Each part of the antler contains different hormone-supporting compounds with a variety of properties.. Since many velvet antler manufacturers only use the lower calcified portions of the antler (cheaper to purchase) we recommend using the deer velvet from New Zealand for maximum effectiveness since the whole antler is used containing more of the cartilaginous tissue. New Zealand velvet antler processed in this whole form appears to provide the widest selection of chemical compounds associated with the benefits claimed through research for both men and women .

-excerpted from the book Aaargh! Menopause available as a free download at http://menopausebook.gr8.com

What does the thyroid have to do with weight loss?

In order for your body to burn food for fuel it must have a healthy thyroid to kickstart the process. The function of the thyroid gland is to take iodine and convert it into thyroid hormones. Thyroid cells are the only cells in the body which can absorb iodine. These cells combine iodine and the amino acid tyrosine to make T3 and T4 which then released into the blood stream and are transported throughout the body to control metabolism (conversion of oxygen and calories to energy).

So the thyroid needs iodine, but our processed foods contain scant levels of iodine. Plus certain chemicals we ingest daily block iodine in our cells. The three most prevalent are chlorine (in water and cleaning products), fluoride (in toothpaste and water) and bromide (found in commercial baked goods and soft drinks). When we diet and “starve” our cells our metabolism eventually slows down and losing weight becomes more of an effort. Increasing iodine in your diet can help to jump-start your metabolism again.

If you can find iodized salt and are not salt-restricted, you can help by using that condiment. You can also buy iodine supplements containing potassium iodide, sodium iodide and molecular iodine. A recommended dosage is 3-6.25 mg/daily.

– we have a new free ebook out for those of you who are going through or are post-menopause with all the related side-effects! Aaargh! Menopause…. check it out http://menopausebook.gr8.com

 

Menopausal reduction of hormones and resulting symptoms.

Going through menopause for some women can be a breeze. But, for the rest of us when our hormone levels are dropping, we can get symptoms. A deficiency of one hormone can trigger a relative excess of another and result in common imbalances such as:

Estrogen dominance or low progesterone can result in mood swings, migraines, fat gain in hips and thighs. Low estrogen or fluctuations of estrogen
t can trigger hot flashes, night sweats, palpitations, foggy thinking, memory lapse & vaginal dryness. Low testosterone or DHEA may lead to decreases in bone or muscle mass, metabolism, energy, strength, stamina, exercise tolerance & libido.

High cortisol (produced by the adrenals as a reaction to stressors which could include hormone imbalance) results in insomnia, anxiety, sugar cravings, feeling tired but wired and  increased belly fat, whereas low cortisol causes chronic fatigue, low energy, food and sugar cravings, poor exercise tolerance or recovery & low immune reserves.

Changes in estrogen and progesterone levels can impact neurotransmitter levels. For instance, a drop in estrogen can result in a drop in serotonin which is you feel good neurotransmitter resulting in more depression or feeling of anxiety.  Changes in estrogen levels can also lead to thyroid symptoms like slowed metabolism and always feeling cold. In fact, many women experiencing menopause will be diagnosed with hypothyroidism.

A simple saliva test can determine your levels and a good naturopath can suggest supplements that may alleviate those conditions. You can also take velvet antler which is the tonic used in Asia for menopause that helps correct hormone imbalances. See the website www.4EasyMenopause.com

Cellular Rejuvenation book download – no charge.

How to Live Longer with Cellular Rejuvenation
Nutrients that can lessen the aging process and improve cellular health.

Free ebook download: http://LiveLongerebook.gr8.com

cellularrejuvencvrIt’s a symptom of old age! How many times have we heard that said when we develop aches and pains. Old age isn’t what it used to be – people are living longer and staying active into their eighties or beyond. If you want to be one of those healthy individuals you must read this book.

Discover:
• What can slow down cellular aging
• How to maintain cognitive health
• Key ingredients for immune support
• Powerful antioxidants and free-radical fighters
• Botanicals that guard against disease
• Medicinal foods
• The biology of weight control
• Help for joint and muscle rejuvenation
• How to reduce Candida and support digestion
• Compounds that delay aging and support DNA

Scientific evidence supports the information presented in this book with many studies proving the efficacy of the natural compounds described. This compilation of extensive research will motivate you towards lifestyle changes you can begin when you are young, lengthening your road to longevity.

By Nina Anderson, C.NLP, SPN   and edited by Joe Coco

http://www.SafeGoodsPublishing.com