Tag Archives: osteoporosis

Low magnesium may inhibit vitamin D

A review published in the Jnl of American Osteopathic Assn found that vitamin D cannot be metabolized without the body having high enough magnesium levels. Vitamin D can increase our calcium and phosphate levels but if your magnesium levels are low you may suffer from vascular calcification which is prevented by sufficient magnesium. This mineral also helps prevent osteoporosis attributed to low levels of vitamin D. Dr. Mohammed S. Razzaque, professor of pathology at Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine says ” without magnesium vitamin D is not really useful or safe.”

And, if you have enough magnesium you won’t need huge amounts of D. The RDA for magnesium is 420mg for men and 320 for women but our diet only gives us 50% of this. Foods high in refined grains, fat, phosphate and sugar contribute to magnesium deficiencies. Foods providing magnesium are almonds, bananas, beans, broccoli, brown rice, cashews, egg yolk, flaxseed, green veggies, milk, mushrooms, oatmeal, pumpkin and sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, sweet corn and whole grains. But unless you eat a lot of these it may be prudent to take a magnesium supplement. – reprinted in part from Nutraceutical World, April 2018.

*Note: the liquid vitamin complex I take contains 300 mg magnesium and 2500iu vit. D-3. www.LongLifeNews.com   (Vitality Combo)

Velvet Antler for Joints, Anti-Aging and Athletes.

deerDeer velvet (humanely harvested fuzz on the antlers) traditionally was used in China over a thousand years ago.  Even today, many oriental countries rely on it for its rejuvenation properties, alleviating of menopause symptoms and as an aphrodisiac. In addition users have discovered its good for promoting growth in children, increasing blood in the body, helping cardiovascular disorders, preventing aging and loss of memory, treating menstrual disorders, addressing impotence and infertility and strengthening stamina.

 

Since 1991 New Zealand scientists have been carrying out a unique investigation into the composition and medical properties of velvet at AgResearch Invermay on the South Island. Their studies verified ancient claims to the efficacy of velvet’s properties. A Russian study revealed that velvet antler has hypotensive, erythopoietic, anti-stress stimulating, anti-inflammatory, gonadotrophic, growth and metabolic effects. Athletes have found velvet antler beneficial for repair of stressed joints and for the added stamina and endurance it seems to provide.

 

I personally had meniscus damage in my knees from skiing. Not want to face surgery I tried the New Zealand velvet antler (NZVEL) along with a topical cream that contained CMO (Joint Medic). I hate to say the word “cure”, but I no longer have trick knees, no pain and no clicking in my knee. The combination seems to have restored my synovial fluid and somehow reduced the bone on bone trauma whenever I would run or bike. I used to wear a brace to protect the lateral movement on my knee… no more! I can bike without becoming crippled afterwards and hiking and skiing are no problem anymore.

 

Velvet Antler warrants further investigation if you have a specific condition you think it may help. There is a copy of the book  “Velvet Antler, Powerful tonic for joints, infertility, blood pressure, athletic performance and more” available at http://bit.ly/1ncFoid for $1 as a PDF or you can buy the paperback at Amazon http://amzn.to/1oTH0SI. More info on the actual NZVEL product I used is available at http://bit.ly/1kdt55v.

Helpers to reduce bone loss

Bone loss in menopausal and post-menopausal women is a great concern. We have been told to take calcium, but what kind… the controversy still rages. The big question is whatever kind of calcium you take, will it get absorbed? To do this you need co-factors like vitamin K-2. Without this form of vitamin K calcium cannot be properly metabolized and could cause cardiovascular problems.  An NIH study confirmed that calcium only (1000 mg/day) showed an increase in heart disease death, primarily in men. Magnesium is also needed because it  helps protect your bone health, according to MayoClinic.com. About half of the magnesium in the body is found in the bones. As the magnesium level decreases in bone, bone crystals become large, brittle and more likely to fracture. The Linus Pauling Institute notes that inadequate magnesium levels in blood serum result in low serum calcium levels; impaired hormone action; and interference with the effects of vitamin D, which can increase bone loss. Several studies suggest that magnesium supplementation may improve bone mineral density

 

Vitamin D is also necessary, in the D3 form helps regulate the minerals calcium and phosphorus in the body, promoting the absorption of calcium and helping prevent bone loss. Vitamin E tocotrienols are effective for bone resorption and inhibit osteoclast formation (large multinucleate cells that tear down bone). Some tests have shown that flaxseed oil as a fat source increases bone density because of the Alpha Linolenic Acid in the oil which also inhibits the activity of the osteoclasts and supports the osteoblasts (build bone). Fermented soy isoflavones also increase bone density by providing weak estrogenic effects on the bone since bone health is directly associated with lowering hormone levels.

 

The anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin can also help as high levels of C-Reactive Protein (a marker of inflammation) may be related to bone loss.  Collagen is a binding site for bone-health minerals and is critical to increasing bone mass. Nutrients that help in collagen production include vitamin C, D3 and those that block the anti-collagen amino acid such as vitamin B6, B12 and folic acid.  Another needed supplement is silica which keeps the bone-building process running smoothly bringing more calcium to the bone, allowing less to leach away from the bones and keeping the whole system balanced.

 

With this information you may be able to formulate a good program of supplements to avoid bone loss. For more information go to www.wh0lefoodsmagazine.com and search for the article “Women’s Health Update” by Kaylynn Chiarello-Ebner

Calcium, Magnesium, Vitamin D3, K2, Silica and Fermented soy sold on www.foreveryoungcooperative.com

Bone health – clarification of supplements vs. drugs

Traditional medical approaches to fostering bone health is to reduce the activity of the osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are the cells that resorb, or break down and absorb, bone tissue back into the body.  Osteoclasts are highly specialized cells that must work in perfect synchronization with osteoblasts to maintain the skeletal system. Unfortunately allopathic drugs in reducing the osteoclast activity has the unfortunate effect of not ony preventing bone loss, but also does not foster the renewal of bone. Therefore, the body will be subjected to the increased possibility of microfactures and other factors that weaken bones.

We have found that calcium (particularly eggschell calcium) can improve bone marrow density, but it must be used in conjunction with other co-factors like collagen protein (silicon supplements support this), vitamin K-2 menaquinone-7 and magnesium.  The K2 will activate osteocalcin (bone gla protein) a non-collagen protein abundant in bone. Magnesium has been shown to keep calcium in the bones and must be balanced with calcium intake in a 1:1 ratio.  In addition a good electrolyte-forming trace-mineral supplement, (www.electroblast.com)  that includes boron, manganese, copper, and silica is needed to help remineralize the bone. Vitamin D is well-known as a hormone involved in mineral metabolism and bone growth.  It facilitates intestinal absorption of calcium, although it also stimulates absorption of phosphate and magnesium ions.  In the absence of vitamin D, dietary calcium is not absorbed at all efficiently. Therefore, vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol) supplmentation should be added to your diet if you do not get enough sun nor eat fish. D3 is the natural form of D. D2 is synthetic so we advise going natural.

Information extracted from: K.M. Rynder; “Magnesium, etc.” Jnl of the Am. Geriatrics Soc. 53(11), 1875-80 (2005); K.J. Ruff, “Eggshell, etc.” Clin. Interv. in Aging 4, 235-240 (2009)