Monthly Archives: March 2015

Study on fructose and depression

Constance Harrell of Emory Univ. tested adolescent rats to see the effect of a high fructose diet on their responses to stressors. She determined that this diet was linked to their depressive-like behavior. A genetic pathway in the brain that plays a key role in regulating the way the brain responds to stress was also altered. These findings indicate that consuming a diet high in fructose throughout adolescence may exacerbate depressive behaviors and affect the way the body and brain respond to stress. If you are depressed now, what was your diet like when you were younger?

Chemotherapy reported to do more harm than good ….

As a chemist trained to interpret data, it is incomprehensible to me that physicians can ignore the clear evidence that chemotherapy does much, much more harm than good.”
– Alan Nixon, Ph.D., Past President of The American Chemical Society

Overall survival of patients with primary breast cancer has not improved in the past 10 years, despite increasing use of multiple-drug chemotherapy for treatment of metastasis. Furthermore, there has been no improvement in survival from first metastasis, and survival may even have been shortened in some patients given chemotherapy…. Actuarial survival analysis … reveals no prolongation in overall survival, despite the increased use of multiple-drug chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The survival of the 78 patients who received chemotherapy from first detection of metastases (including single-agent chemotherapy) was no better than that of the 80 who did not receive chemotherapy. There was also no improvement in survival for those who received multiple-drug chemotherapy (66 patients)…. The fact that regressions of breast cancer had no influence on overall survival must reflect the inadequacy of present-day chemotherapy.”

Read More:

    http://www.endalldisease.com/study-chemotherapy-treated-cancer-patients-die-sooner-than-the-untreated/

Magnesium needed if you are stressed!

Magnesium is responsible for converting light energy from the sun into biochemical energy for life process on earth (center of the chlorophyll molecule). It is a direct cofactor in over 300 enzymatic reactions involving DNA and RNA synthesis, protein synthesis, glucose uptake and metabolism and has a major role in releasing energy from ATP in the body.

 

It is implicated in hormone synthesis, nerve cell function, digestion and muscle contraction/relaxation, responses of heart and blood vessels and our emotional state. But, only about half of the population gets enough magnesium from the foods they eat. RDAs run from 300-420 mg/day with older folks needing more and for those of us who are under stress.

 

Magnesium deficiency can induce anxiety and can also cause depression according to Carolyn Dean, MD, ND, Nutritional Magnesium Assn. medical advisory board. “A deficiency of magnesium magnifies anxiety, depression and stress. Serotonin, the feel-good brain chemical that is boosted artificially by some medications, depends on magnesium for its production and function. If the deficit is not corrected anxiety, depression and further health problems can linger.”

 

Under stress your body pumps magnesium out of the cells and into the blood making normal lab test show you have enough when in fact, you have body-wide depletion. A Magnesium RBC (red blood cell) test can give you better results. If you continue to be stressed out the stress hormones begin to mobilize magnesium from vital tissues such as the heart putting the body in jeopardy. It is a cofactor for potassium and calcium channels so they should be taken in combination to keep a proper balance of these minerals.

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