Monthly Archives: September 2018

AntiAgingLady’s dad’s new book on flying and barnstorming in the 1930s

I thought I would alert you to my latest endeavor. My dad wrote his flying memoirs prior to passing away and finally I put them together in this book. Lots of cool stories, photos, news clippings from back then and tales of his flying adventures and misadventures…  check it out.

A Barnstormer Aviator. My personal journey to scarf and goggles flying in the 1930s Author: Nick Vuyosevich with Nina Anderson

ISBN 9781513637075 12.95  Click Here to Order

Living in the 1930s, with nary a nickel in his pocket an immigrant’s son learned to fly. This was Nick’s story written by him 50 years after that first solo.  Come back to the time when crashes were common,  navigation was “I follow roads”,  scarf and    goggles were standard pilot gear and barnstorming was the way to get folks out to the airport for a ride. Written by a pilot from the 1930s who tells his story of learning to fly in Clarence Chamberlin’s airplanes and becoming a barnstormer, who founded the Jersey City Flying Club, Clifton and Whippany airports. He tells his adventures in flying the Hisso Standard, Swallow two place with OX5 and Kinner engines, Waco, Great Lakes, along with the Consolidated Trainer, as well as the Curtiss Fledging, Eaglerock, and many other biplanes of the times.

“This true story written by a New Jersey biplane pilot, is filled with names, places, aircraft and adventures from the golden era of aviation! What a fun read.”  James P. Adams, ATP, Gold Seal Flight Instructor, Retired FAA Operations Inspector, FAASTeam Program Manager

“This book gave me insight to the circuitous path budding   pilots, who were just part of the general population, had to follow to learn to fly. I loved the misadventures, calamities and comradery depicted among the early aviators that Nick described.”  Nova Hall, author of Spirit and Creator, The Mysterious Man Behind Lindbergh’s Flight to Paris.

“General aviation pilots from the 1920s and 30s are at times overlooked especially those from New Jersey.  As the industry grew in New Jersey, few chronicled the struggle to provide flight schools, airports and flying clubs for would-be aviators seeking to fly those incredible scarf and goggles machines. This book describes the trials and tribulations, adventures and misadventures, and the insider stories of early aviators such as Clarence Chamberlin, Eddie Gorski, Chet Coons and George Stone. Documented with original photos, this book is an archival treasure of New Jersey flying in the golden age of aviation”.  – Ralph Villecca, Executive Director, Aviation Hall of Fame & Museum Of New Jersey

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Computer Blue light and Eye’s

Blue light is not necessarily bad. Certain wavelengths of blue light can help boost mood as well as alertness, memory and even cognitive function. But, recently researchers are warning that overexposure due to the time we are on electronics that generate thee wavelengths can cause eye problems over time.

According to an article in the American Optometric Association journal “Early research shows that overexposure to blue light could contribute to eye strain and discomfort and may lead to serious conditions later life such as age-related macular degeneration which can cause blindness.” Other research has shown that overexposure to blue light can accelerate the aging of eyes and lead to dry eye and eye fatigue even when you view your electronic screen for only short periods of time.

To protect yourself if you have to be on the computer a lot you could supplement with lutein and zeaxanthin. Both are found naturally in the eye and are responsible for protecting the eye from light-induced damage. Studies have shown that increasesed consumption of these ingredients lowered risk of developing macular degeneration.

Additional research has shown that children are a greater risk as their crystalline lenses are more transparent and more susceptible to these short wavelengths associated with blue light and LED lighting found in many classrooms.Food that contain lutein are fruit, vegetables such as broccoli, grapes, kale , kiwi, spinach, zucchini many of which also contain zeaxanthin (also found in egg yolk, orange tangerines and turnip greens).

Cutting your blue light exposure is key but not always possible in our tech-centered culture. To change the light so it is not so blue after dark, search online for a download that alters your screen color to a more rose shade. This will also reduce the attack on melatonin of which the production is hampered by the blue light. This will help (especially your teenager who is on a screen until the last moment at night) reduce insomnia.

see the full article: http://www.wholefoodsmagazine.com  August 2018