Tag Archives: heart attacks

Coronary problems, eye disease and homocysteine levels.

Homocysteine is a naturally occurring amino acid that is a breakdown product of the essential amino acid methionine. If your levels are high you may be at risk for coronary problems, cancer, deep vein thrombosis, stroke, kidney disease, hypothyroidism and reduced physical performance in older women. High levels also have been linked to aging eye disease such as macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy.

Normally homocysteine is converted into a harmless amino, cysteine or back into methionine but gluten sensitivity may increase the buildup and thwart its normal conversion. The usual problem is low B vitamins and low folate (B9)* which helps homocysteine normalize as well low levels of B6 and B12. Since stomach acid is required to produce B12 and adequate folic acid absorption, the aging body may suffer because they have reduced stomach acid. Also if you use acid-blocking heartburn drugs to reduce stomach acid that will affect your ability to process the B vitamins.

Routine blood tests can confirm B vitamin deficiencies but you should also ask to have your homocysteine levels checked. If low and if you have stomach acid problems you may want to supplement.

*folic acid is the synthetic version of  folate… not as good.

…Check out our sponsor for a liquid that contains the B complex vitamins: Daily Metrix  www.longlifenews.com

 

Advertisements

We need help with a longevity survey

AAladyLOGOWe are getting ready to put together a course “Ten Days to Living Longer” and have been asking folks to take a short survey so we can determine what to include. Folks so far have been saying they are concerned about joints, eyes, cardio, energy levels and memory. If you have a minute (really its just about a minute) could you take the survey too? On the thank you page there is a link so you can get a free download of our ebook “Think and Feel Younger” for your trouble. We will keep you posted on other additions to the survey as they come in.

Click Here for the survey.

 

 

Things in your drinks.

stadionrunneronlyWith many of us switching from carbonated soda pop to fruit, flavored water and tea drinks , we still have to be aware of ingredients. Some of those drinks are not organic, some may still use dyes or preservatives or sweeteners that are not good for your body even though the manufactures say they are safe in small amounts.

Coal tar derivatives used for coloring such as Red #40 and Yellow #6 can cause sensitivity to viruses and have been linked to cancer. Cochineal extract is used as a cola coloring and is basically ground up female cochineal bugs from South America. While this may not be appealing, we still don’t know if they are laden with critters or pesticides that could affect our health. Artificial sweeteners that go by several names now but started out as aspartame, when heated (like if left in your hot car in the summer) breaks down to toxic methyl alcohol. It has  been implicated in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s and can cause headaches and seizures in some people. AceK sounds safe enough but it has shown to cause cancer in animals. Sucralose is chlorinated sugar and has shown in studies to have a negative effect on the thymus gland, decreased red blood cell count, diarrhea among other potential conditions.

Agave is a sweetener in many natural foods drinks. The fructose content of agave syrup is much higher than that of high fructose corn syrup, which is of concern since some research has linked high fructose intake to weight gain (especially around the abdominal area), high triglycerides, heart disease and insulin resistance. And I’m sure by now you’ve read by blog posts on why to stay away from high fructose corn syrup (not the least is that it is GMO).

Chemicals such a Propylene glycol and ployethylene glycol (PEG) are sometimes added to drinks.  The former has shown to be toxic and induce seizures in epileptics as well as affect the heart. It also inhibits the growth of the friendly bacteria in your intestines leading to constipation. PEG is used as a drug to induce diarrhea before surgery. Now why would you want to have that in your drink? It also has shown to interfere with blood thinners, birth control pills, and antiinflammatories.

So, the next time you pick up that sports drink, protein shake, or health drink – read the label!

-excerpted from the book I wrote:  Analyzing Sports Drinks

PS. Don’t forget to get a FREE e-copy of my new book “Think and Feel Younger” Click Here

 

 

Hydrogenated oils going bye bye!

Based on a review of scientific evidence the FDA has finalized its determination that partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs) the primary dietary source of artificial trans fat in processed foods, do not fit the GRAS specifications for use in human foods. Manufactures will now have 3 years to remove them from their products.

“This action is expected to reduce coronary heart disease and prevent thousands of fatal heart attacks every year,” says FDAs Acting Commissioner Stephen Ostroff, MD.

-Neutraceuticals World, July/Aug. 2015

The need for extra magnesium and potassium

You may not know if you are deficient in magnesium or potassium, but if so, it will have a substantial effect on your health. Magnesium is a co-factor in more than 300 enzyme systems that regulate biochemical reactions in the body including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control and blood pressure regulation and it is essential to heart health. Studies have shown people have less heart attacks and strokes when they have sufficient levels of magnesium. Diets with good magnesium levels are associated with a significantly lower risk of diabetes as low blood magnesium levels may worsen insulin resistance.

 

Potassium is needed for proper function of cells, tissues and organs. It is also a required electrolyte that conducts electricity and is essential for nerve transmissions. But, potassium must be balanced with other electrolytes including magnesium. It is also crucial to heart health as well as playing a key role in skeletal and smooth muscle contraction which effects not only muscles but digestion as well. Potassium also plays a role in regulating blood pressure in relationship with sodium. Insufficient potassium is associated with poor bone health and muscular weakness including heart failure and cramping.

 

According to the NHANES Dietary Survey done from 2007-2010, none of the 17000 participants met their average requirement for potassium and it was estimated that 52% of Americans do not get their required magnesium each day.

 

Foods high in magnesium are beans and nuts, whole grain bread and green leafy vegetables. Foods high in potassium are squash, yogurt, fish, avocados, beans, green leafy veggies. But if you are concerned that although you eat this you may not get enough, run to the health foods store and get a supplement.

More Sugar Spurs Better Chance of Heart Problems.

coneSummer’s coming and we all like ice cream,  lemonade, and maybe a Margarita or two.  But… listen up! The  Journal of the American Medical Assn. recently published a research study that found a significant relationship between the additional consumption of sugar and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death.

 

A highly controlled study that took  into account age, sex, race/ethnicity, sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical characteristics recorded added sugar consumption as a percentage of average daily calories and determined that there was a significant relationship between added sugar and CVD. During the 2005-2010 time period, most adults consumed 10% or more of their daily calories from added sugar with 10% of all adults reviewed consuming 25% or more of their daily calories from added sugar.

 

Other studies have shown a large part of these sugar calories comes from what we drink. Sports, electrolyte and energy drinks may be loaded with sugar as are latte’s, soda, packaged fruit drink soda alternatives and even bottled teas. Don’t substitute those sugared beverages for sugar-free ones unless you have determined the artificial sweetener  (just as aspartame or AceK) does not come with a list of potential health risks.

 

Ck out our choice for an electrolyte beverage maker that has no sugar or artificial sweeteners. electroBlast.com   We found a 50% discount on that site to try specific flavors of the product.

The healthy kind of soy. Fermented (good) vs. unfermented (bad)!

Reprinted from the blog: Jivahealthnews.wordpress.com

Soy contains 42 percent protein, more than any other plant.36 It’s high in fiber. It’s a natural source of good-for-you omega-3 fatty acids. It’s a powerhouse of protective antioxidants and phyto-nutrients (beneficial compounds found in plants). It provides a wealth of vitamins, including vitamins A (as beta-17 carotene), B1, B2, B12, C, D, E, and K – and several essential minerals, such as selenium and zinc.

Cultured (fermented) Soy vs. Uncultured Soy In order to reap the nutritional benefits of soy, it must be cultured. Culturing simply means adding beneficial microbial cultures to a food and letting them transform it into something more nutritious and digestible. Yogurt, sour cream, kefir, and pickles are all examples of cultured foods.

The Importance of Culturing If you take a trip to China, Japan, Indonesia, or Singapore, you’ll find that the traditional Asian diet does not include large quantities of super-processed, genetically modified soy products like we have in Western countries today (such as isolated soy protein, a common ingredient found in nutrition bars). It incorporates small amounts of natural, cultured whole soy foods, such as natto (cultured soybeans), miso (a condiment made from cultured soybean paste), shoyu (soy sauce or tamari), and tempeh (a compact cultured soybean cake). 

Bad Soy & Anti-Nutrients Soy wasn’t even considered edible until fermentation techniques were developed during the Chou Dynasty. What the producers of modern, uncultured soy foods won’t tell you is that in addition to all the nutrients it contains, soy also contains anti-nutrients. These anti-nutrients prevent your body from absorbing essential minerals and trace elements. Unfortunately, cooking will not destroy these anti-nutrients. Only the culturing process will. Another benefit of culturing is that it makes it easier for your body to digest and absorb the goodness of soy. When you culture a food, you’re basically using beneficial microbial cultures to pre-digest it. Those cultures transform large, hard-to-digest molecules into small, easy-to-digest ones. Not only that, culturing soy also reduces its allergic qualities. (Soy is one of the most common food allergens.)

According to two newly published research papers, tests in samples of human blood showed that when soy is cultured, its potential to produce an allergic reaction is reduced by as much as 99 percent. The most important benefit of culturing, though, is that the process is thought to convert certain phyto-nutrients, called genistein and daidzein, into their active forms, genistein and daidzein. Both genistein and daidzein are powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents that have been shown in voluminous laboratory studies to work in multiple ways to support optimal health.

[Editor note: we use the JIVA Fermented Soy/Curcumin Nutritional Beverage Mix for guarding against cancer, strokes and heart attacks as explained in the book “Prevent Cancer, Strokes, Heart Attacks and other Deadly Killers” by Dr. Vijaya Nair. This tastes like a ginger cookie.. yum!  Click on the link on our blog for ForeverYoungCooperative. They carry it.]